Rigidity

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rigidity

[ri′jid·əd·ē]
(astrophysics)
The ratio of the momentum of a cosmic-ray particle to its electric charge, in units of the electron charge.
(mechanics)
The quality or state of resisting change in form.

Rigidity

 

the capability of a body or structure to resist deformation; a physicogeometric characteristic of the cross section of a structural element. In the case of simple deformations within the limits of Hooke’s law, rigidity is determined numerically as the product of the modulus of elasticity E (on elongation-contraction and on flexure) or G (on shear and torsion) and some geometric characteristic of the element cross section:EF on elongation-compression, El on flexure, GF on shear, and so on, where F is the cross section area, and I is the axial moment of inertia. The concept of rigidity is being widely used in the solution of problems concerning the strength of materials.


Rigidity

 

in physiology, a functional state of the skeletal muscles, characterized by a marked increase in their tone and in their resistance to deformation. Muscle rigidity results from changes in the character of the neural influences that the central and peripheral nervous systems continuously exert to the muscles. An example of rigidity is decerebrate rigidity.

In man, injuries and disturbances of the central nervous system and pathological irritation of the peripheral nerves give rise to various manifestations of muscle rigidity. Thus, poisoning by certain toxins, diseases of the nervous system, and hypnosis may cause a state of plastic tone, characterized by a waxlike condition of the muscles. In this state the extremities may easily be placed in any position and can remain thus, unchanged, for a prolonged period. Plastic tone characterizes a state of the nervous system called catalepsy, or plastic rigidity.

rigidity

That property of a material which resists a change in its physical shape.

rigidity

i. The resistance offered by a body when under load. It is the ratio of the stress to the strain. Also known as stiffness
ii. A property of a gyroscope by which its axis will remain in a fixed direction in space unless the rotor is acted upon by an external torque.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such nominal rigidities play central role in the modern mainstream macroeconomics and in monetary theory (Zbaracki, 2007).
Price rigidities are thought of as costs or psychological barriers to price changes (Andersen, 1994).
The presence of nominal rigidities in price setting generates trade-offs between the two exchange rate regimes.
The capacity utilization rate, which is deemed to have an impact on ICT diffusion via the accelerator effect, and, alternatively, different variables representing capital market rigidities are put forward as explanatory variables.
Almost all of the work on nominal price rigidities has answered this question using the framework of monopolistic competition, which assumes that the product whose price has to be determined is produced by a profit-maximizing monopoly.
Monetary policy cannot compensate for these real rigidities without inflating.
Rigidities may arise from the manner in which prices are adjusted.
The first large part contains the three fields of real rigidities: real wage rigidities and the labor market, credit rationing and imperfect capital markets, real rigidities in the goods market.
dollar-pegged economies, fiscal consolidation and structural reforms to address factor market rigidities will be especially important for maintaining competitiveness.
Using the data in table 1, MSP rigidities in daN/mm are as follows:
A downgrade for Colombia could be avoided if Colombian authorities articulate a viable plan addressing the looming pension problem and other structural rigidities in public finances early next year.
While the city's fiscal autonomy constitutes a credit strength and budgetary rigidities have lessened somewhat, officials must continue to follow a path of fiscal discipline so as to maintain a sustainable debt burden through final amortization.