Rigorism

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rigorism

 

strict adherence to a principle in action, conduct, and thought, excluding any compromise or consideration of principles differing from the ground principle. Moral rigorism is characteristic of such movements in Protestantism as Puritanism. In ethics, the principle of rigorism was formulated by I. Kant in his doctrine of duty as the sole criterion of morality. According to Kant, only acts prompted by motives of duty can be considered moral. Acts which in themselves do not contradict the requirements of duty and which may even answer those requirements cannot be considered moral if they were performed for other motives, such as natural inclination.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, even the rigorist Iavorskyi made a small concession to the fact that Petrine Russia was a multireligious polity.
In response to the rigorist and minimalist Protopiro, his opponent Didascolo advocated Piranesi's belief in the creative license of the designer--'the crazy liberty of following his own caprice' as triumphantly demonstrated in the works of Borromini and Bernini.
Sullivan writes that both Gutierre and King Pedro "ate egregiously mistaken in their actions [...] but the richness of Calderon's critique lies in the portrayal of the exculpation of a moral rigorist by a moral laxist [...].
While theoretically Catholicism forbids the direct taking of innocent life at any stage of life, the most rigorist sanctions are applied to taking unborn life, while there are no sanctions applied to killing non-combatants in war, selling toxic waste to farmers as fertilizer that cause people to sicken and die, favoring military spending over social welfare spending that is impoverishing the majority of the world's population and any number of other actions which have the consequences of unjust and untimely death.
make no secret of their adherence to a radical or "rigorist"
Disappointed by his loss to Cornelius in the Papal election of 251, the Roman priest Novatian became head of the rigorist faction that condemned leniency to those who had evaded martyrdom, and was consecrated as the rival Bishop of Rome.
No rigorist has been recorded who would not utter a lie even by way of a joke, like Epaminondas.
Quakerism, principally in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, infused a mystical noncomformism into the colonies, while later immigrations of German Anabaptists--Mennonites, the Amish, Hutterites--imported a "free church" discipline of somewhat more rigorist variety, and perhaps something of radical Anabaptism's apocalyptic utopianism (it would be difficult, at any rate, to be unimpressed by the similarities between the tragic history of the 1535 "Kingdom of Munster" and that of the compound at Waco).
We can now give the principled response to the rigorist rejoinder broached in note 26.
It also presents a new view of Lambrecht's work, and with a vengeance, putting him forward as an author engaged in secular themes (not as the clerical rigorist he has been traditionally held to be) and rehabilitating him as no mere botcher of Alberic's work.
Such productions, in a mass-market communication industry, necessarily are what Sinetar (1993: 27) called a collaborative art form, "the product of multiple psyches." As such they are bound to be a typical product of committees and never will achieve the perfection rigorist critics might want.
(It could be argued in hindsight that it had the opposite effect, for the rigorist wing then became more assertive in its claims.) Bonaventure sought to transpose Francis into a universal prophet, who was sent to rejuvenate the entire Church.