riparian zone


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riparian zone

[rī′per·ē·ən ‚zōn]
(ecology)
The part of the watershed immediately adjacent to the stream channel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, we have USWD and riparian zone management systems which can potentially capture and manage floods and store up to 3,000 MAF of water in the aquifers a staggering 20 years of storage.
Riparian zones increase regional species richness by harboring different, not more, species.
At Kurtna the diatom diversity in the riparian zone of the soft-water eutrophic lake (H = 1.49 [+ or -] 0.3) was significantly (F = 9.1, p < 0 .001) lower than near the hard-water mesotrophic (H = 2.07 [+ or -] 0.1) and dyseutrophic lakes (H = 2.13 [+ or -] 0.1).
One of the biggest hurdles in utilizing the existing legislative mechanism for riparian zone management is the widespread impact that already has been incurred and that cannot be take care of now.
In order to evaluate the effect of water regime changes, five sub-wetlands were distinguished based on the vegetation structure of Lake Cedasas and its riparian zone: open water, hydrophytes, helophytes, open grass and mire scrub (Table 2).
(2) For the river without levee, we take the zone, near the river, being different from surrounding land-use as the riparian zone.
Land-use analysis, forest successional stages and riparian zone width were carried from manual interpretations of high resolution imagery from IKONOS satellite (2006) with lm of spatial resolution, using the functions of a geographical information system (ArcGis 9.2, ESRI, USA).
One group of species, not strongly associated with the cloud forest, is found exclusively in the riparian zones below 2600m composed primarily of Guzmania species (Guzmania besseae, G.
However, minimal alteration of the riparian zone in Madison County has occurred since 1998.
Although the beetles have munched away miles of tamarisk, it's impossible to predict where the bugs will go, says Stacy Kolegas, executive director of the Tamarisk Coalition, a nonprofit dedicated to restoring riparian zones. "In some places you'll see lots of defoliated tamarisk, and then right across the river the trees look healthy."
Width of the riparian zone, presence of agriculture fields, and number of roads within 200 m of the river, were measured on georectified aerial photographs.