rise

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rise

1. the appearance of the sun, moon, or other celestial body above the horizon
2. the vertical height of a step or of a flight of stairs
3. the vertical height of a roof above the walls or columns
4. the height of an arch above the impost level
5. Angling the act or instance of fish coming to the surface of the water to take flies, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Rise

Vertical height of an arch, roof truss, or rigid frame.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rise

 

the maximum height of the geometric axis or median surface of a curved structure, such as an arch or a vault, above the line or plane joining the abutments of the structure. The magnitude of the rise is chosen on the basis of a number of factors—for example, the most advantageous structural behavior of the structure. Architectural considerations, such as the general layout of the structure, also influence the height chosen for the rise. The concept of rise is sometimes extended to linear or planar structures that have a camber.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

rise

[rīz]
(astronomy)
Of a celestial body, to cross the visible horizon while ascending.
(geology)
A long, broad elevation which rises gently from its surroundings, such as the sea floor.
(hydrology)
(science and technology)
The increase in the height or the value of something, such as a rise of tide or a rise of temperature.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rise

1. The height of a flight of stairs from landing to landing.
2. The height between successive treads of a stair.
3. The vertical distance such as that used to express the height of a roof slope compared to horizontal distance or run, or the vertical measurement from the face of one stair tread to the next.
4. In an arch, the vertical distance from the springing line to the highest point of the intrados.
5. Of elevators, same as travel.

travel, rise

Of an elevator, escalator, etc., the vertical distance between the bottom terminal landing and the top terminal landing.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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But Central Ayrshire MP Donohoe said it was right for the rise to go ahead, adding: "This is not an 11 per cent pay rise, it is a package that in the end will be cost-neutral.
As I pointed out earlier, demand has been depressed by the rise in energy prices as well as by the needed slowing in the pace of accumulation of business capital and consumer durable assets.
The rise in bond yields has boosted the dollar in foreign exchange markets; since mid-April, the dollar has generally traded against an average of the currencies of the other major industrial countries about 4 percent above its level at the end of December.
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