aspiration

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aspiration

1. 
a. the act of breathing
b. a breath
2. removal of air or fluid from a body cavity by suction
3. Med
a. the sucking of fluid or foreign matter into the air passages of the body
b. the removal of air or fluid from the body by suction

aspiration

[‚as·pə′rā·shən]
(medicine)
The removal of fluids from a cavity by suction.
(microbiology)
The use of suction to draw up a sample in a pipette.
(science and technology)
Act or the result of removing, carrying along, or drawing by suction.

aspiration

In an air-conditioned room, the pulling of room air into the moving air-stream which is discharging from a diffuser.
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of patients at risk for aspiration include the following:
(10) When combined with an impaired ability to use expired air to clear the larynx and protect the airway, a weak swallow may contribute to an increased risk for aspiration of pharyngeal contents, which in turn can lead to aspiration pneumonia.
For this project, an evidenced-based screening tool and care protocol were developed to identify patients at high risk for aspiration and implement appropriate preventative interventions.
Although all 30 of these patients were on thickened liquids because of risk for aspiration of thin liquids, only 10 were confirmed to aspirate on thin liquids via modified barium swallow and an additional 12 demonstrated signs of aspiration on bedside evaluation.
Another 11.4% of patients (n = 227) had laryngeal penetration above the vocal folds that was at risk for aspiration.
A routine history and physical examination provide little information that allows otolaryngologists to distinguish between patients who are at risk for aspiration and those who have a "safe swallow." Specific clinical assessment of swallowing involves evaluation of oral control, lingual activity, oral residue, laryngeal excursion, the initiation and timing of the swallow, voice quality, and cough after the swallow.
Patients with chronic debilitating conditions which increase risk for aspiration should also be vaccinated against influenza.
The goals of allied health involvement are to keep the patient mobile, sustain range of motion, incorporate breathing exercises to enhance lung capacity, and evaluate dysphagia that could place the patient at risk for aspiration.
The older adult with one of these conditions is at even greater risk for aspiration because the dysphagia is superimposed on the slowed swallowing rate associated with normal aging (Marik & Kaplan, 2003).
Healthcare professionals have been unsuccessful in identifying patients at high risk for aspiration pneumonia.
If repeated aspirations of tube feedings are allowed to occur, the risk for aspiration pneumonia is increased significantly.

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