ritualism


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ritualism

1. emphasis, esp exaggerated emphasis, on the importance of rites and ceremonies
2. the study of rites and ceremonies, esp magical or religious ones
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He also opposed idol worship and all kinds of discriminations and ritualism. Kindness to all and service to all was the essence of his teachings.
Food itself (or, better, the rejection of it) frames Hopkins's obsession with practices of self-purification that betray his closeness to Anglo-Catholic ritualism.
Merton's analysis on adaptation type called ritualism is also worth explanation.
For instance, table 6 shows that the respondents indicated the themes of injustice (117; 60.3%), retribution (87; 44.8%), extra-marital affair (125; 64.4%), get-rich syndrome (122; 60.9%), ritualism (128; 66.0%), power tussle (100; 51.5%), armed robbery (124; 64.5%), bribery and corruption (111; 57.2%) and bad leadership (96; 49.5%) were prominent in Yoruba home videos.
Better still on ritualism, Turner (1967) defined it as a prescribed formal behaviour for non-technological occasion, indicating beliefs in mystical beings or power.
She confirms this attitude by opposing animal sacrifice and confronting the Brahmin priest with the results of soulless ritualism:
As a sociologist who has worked as a regulator and conducted empirical research, Braithwaite is perhaps the only regulation theorist who recognises, and describes in more than a cursory way, the problems of ritualism and red tape.
Jane Ellen Harrison's "Handmaiden No More": Victorian Ritualism and the Fine Arts.
Zeal tends to calcify into a rote ritualism, and is then revivified, to the chagrin and often against the opposition of the official priesthood, by a man from the desert who is not a member of the prophets' guild.
Merton (1938) identified five forms of deviant adaptation: conformity, innovation, ritualism, retreatism, and rebellion.
Many contemporary discussions on the subjects of fashion, ritualism, and consumerism persuasively indicate converging shifts in the postwar representations of the Modern Woman.
Nicholas McDowell describes Milton's engagement with the baroque idiom of Laudian poetics in which "Crashaw excelled and Milton stuttered" (9), and argues that Milton had a "tendency toward Laudian ritualism" (inspired by his father).