rivet

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rivet,

headed metal pin or bolt whose shaft is passed through holes in two or more pieces of metal, wood, plastic, or other material in order to unite them by forming the plain end into a second head. The button-head rivet has a hemispherical head; the countersunk-head rivet has a flat head made to fit a countersunk hole. A large rivet for building construction is first heated so that the pneumatic hammer used to set it can more easily squash the plain end into a head. When the hot rivet cools, it shrinks and pulls the parts tightly together. For critical work, holes are drilled and reamed to exact size; for most other work they are punched. Full tubular and split rivets can be driven through soft materials without the necessity of first making a hole; after passing through the materials, the rivets' plain ends spread out to form heads as they strike a hard substance. More complicated blind rivets are used when only one side of the work is accessible. The mandrel type is a tube in which a rod with an enlarged end is inserted. After the rivet is pushed into the hole, the rod is pulled back through, crushing the end of the rivet into a head and forcing the sides of the tube against the walls of the hole. The drive-pin type is a tube with an opening at the headless end smaller than at the head end. As the pin is driven through from the head end, it spreads the tube out over the edge of the hole. The explosive blind rivet is filled with an explosive; when the head is heated with an iron, the explosive ignites and expands the headless end over the edge of the hole. Rivets are made of steel, aluminum, copper, and many other metals, and of plastics.

Rivet

A shank with a head that is inserted into holes in the two pieces being joined and closed by forming a head on the projecting shank. The rivets must be red hot to be formed in such a manner and have generally been replaced by welding or bolting.

Rivet

 

a round shank with a preformed primary head on one end and a snap head on the other end that is formed during the riveting process.

Types of rivets include the buttonhead, countersunk, rounded countersunk, cylindrical, conical, and conical with a neck. Rivet sizes are specified by standards. In addition to standard rivets, special rivets, such as tubular or explosive rivets are also used.

Rivets may be made of steel, copper, brass, aluminum, and other alloys that are sufficiently soft for shaping the heads. To avoid electrochemical corrosion and the effects of temperature changes on the forces in the joint, the rivet must be of the same material as that of the parts to be joined.

rivet

[′riv·ət]
(design engineering)
A short rod with a head formed on one end; it is inserted through aligned holes in parts to be joined, and the protruding end is pressed or hammered to form a second head.

rivet

rivet heads
A short pin, of a malleable metal such as iron, steel, or copper, with a head at one end; used to unite two metal plates by passing it through a hole in both plates and then hammering down the point to form a second head.
References in periodicals archive ?
These Rosie the Riveters embodied the We can do it spirit forever connected with the famous poster.
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The Harland and Wolff shipyards are largely dormant now, a place where sailmakers, rope makers, shipwrights, boilermakers, riveters, steel pressers, painters and a host of long-lost tradesmen toiled building the might of the British Empire.
Rosie the Riveter is the image of an independent woman who is in control of her own destiny," the New York Daily News quoted Gladys Beckwith, former director of the Michigan Women's Historical Center and Hall of Fame, as saying.
Posing for our exclusive cover shot today, Amanda Holden recreates the powerful Rosie the Riveter image which resonated so powerfully during World War Two.
Hammer, nails, screwdriver, screws, riveter, and pop rivets