rivet

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rivet,

headed metal pin or bolt whose shaft is passed through holes in two or more pieces of metal, wood, plastic, or other material in order to unite them by forming the plain end into a second head. The button-head rivet has a hemispherical head; the countersunk-head rivet has a flat head made to fit a countersunk hole. A large rivet for building construction is first heated so that the pneumatic hammer used to set it can more easily squash the plain end into a head. When the hot rivet cools, it shrinks and pulls the parts tightly together. For critical work, holes are drilled and reamed to exact size; for most other work they are punched. Full tubular and split rivets can be driven through soft materials without the necessity of first making a hole; after passing through the materials, the rivets' plain ends spread out to form heads as they strike a hard substance. More complicated blind rivets are used when only one side of the work is accessible. The mandrel type is a tube in which a rod with an enlarged end is inserted. After the rivet is pushed into the hole, the rod is pulled back through, crushing the end of the rivet into a head and forcing the sides of the tube against the walls of the hole. The drive-pin type is a tube with an opening at the headless end smaller than at the head end. As the pin is driven through from the head end, it spreads the tube out over the edge of the hole. The explosive blind rivet is filled with an explosive; when the head is heated with an iron, the explosive ignites and expands the headless end over the edge of the hole. Rivets are made of steel, aluminum, copper, and many other metals, and of plastics.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Rivet

A shank with a head that is inserted into holes in the two pieces being joined and closed by forming a head on the projecting shank. The rivets must be red hot to be formed in such a manner and have generally been replaced by welding or bolting.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rivet

 

a round shank with a preformed primary head on one end and a snap head on the other end that is formed during the riveting process.

Types of rivets include the buttonhead, countersunk, rounded countersunk, cylindrical, conical, and conical with a neck. Rivet sizes are specified by standards. In addition to standard rivets, special rivets, such as tubular or explosive rivets are also used.

Rivets may be made of steel, copper, brass, aluminum, and other alloys that are sufficiently soft for shaping the heads. To avoid electrochemical corrosion and the effects of temperature changes on the forces in the joint, the rivet must be of the same material as that of the parts to be joined.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

rivet

[′riv·ət]
(design engineering)
A short rod with a head formed on one end; it is inserted through aligned holes in parts to be joined, and the protruding end is pressed or hammered to form a second head.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rivet

rivet heads
A short pin, of a malleable metal such as iron, steel, or copper, with a head at one end; used to unite two metal plates by passing it through a hole in both plates and then hammering down the point to form a second head.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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"I have always been proud that I was a Rosie the Riveter," Lockart said.
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But unlike the Lennon Sisters, Rosie & the Riveters have soul.
Otto was one of the original the Riveters, the thousands of women who took on jobs for men deployed overseas during World War II.
Clare Edge's grandfather, riveter Robert Stark Young, is sitting second from the right in the second row.
Each was hammered in by hand, and each was a highly skilful and dangerous process where the rivet was heated to red hot, then physically tossed up scaffolding to where it was needed, caught by young boys in leather buckets, then held in place by an assistant before the riveter hammered it home.
ON A CRISP winter MORNING in Richmond, California, I stood at one end of the Rosie the Riveter Memorial and looked around.
Supplies hot-plate, high-frequency, and ultrasonic welders as well as ASC riveters.
They drove buses, streetcars and bulldozers; and built ships and airplanes, carved timber out of forests; and, of course, became riveters. During the war, women swelled the workforce by 50 percent.