rivet

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rivet,

headed metal pin or bolt whose shaft is passed through holes in two or more pieces of metal, wood, plastic, or other material in order to unite them by forming the plain end into a second head. The button-head rivet has a hemispherical head; the countersunk-head rivet has a flat head made to fit a countersunk hole. A large rivet for building construction is first heated so that the pneumatic hammer used to set it can more easily squash the plain end into a head. When the hot rivet cools, it shrinks and pulls the parts tightly together. For critical work, holes are drilled and reamed to exact size; for most other work they are punched. Full tubular and split rivets can be driven through soft materials without the necessity of first making a hole; after passing through the materials, the rivets' plain ends spread out to form heads as they strike a hard substance. More complicated blind rivets are used when only one side of the work is accessible. The mandrel type is a tube in which a rod with an enlarged end is inserted. After the rivet is pushed into the hole, the rod is pulled back through, crushing the end of the rivet into a head and forcing the sides of the tube against the walls of the hole. The drive-pin type is a tube with an opening at the headless end smaller than at the head end. As the pin is driven through from the head end, it spreads the tube out over the edge of the hole. The explosive blind rivet is filled with an explosive; when the head is heated with an iron, the explosive ignites and expands the headless end over the edge of the hole. Rivets are made of steel, aluminum, copper, and many other metals, and of plastics.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Rivet

A shank with a head that is inserted into holes in the two pieces being joined and closed by forming a head on the projecting shank. The rivets must be red hot to be formed in such a manner and have generally been replaced by welding or bolting.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rivet

 

a round shank with a preformed primary head on one end and a snap head on the other end that is formed during the riveting process.

Types of rivets include the buttonhead, countersunk, rounded countersunk, cylindrical, conical, and conical with a neck. Rivet sizes are specified by standards. In addition to standard rivets, special rivets, such as tubular or explosive rivets are also used.

Rivets may be made of steel, copper, brass, aluminum, and other alloys that are sufficiently soft for shaping the heads. To avoid electrochemical corrosion and the effects of temperature changes on the forces in the joint, the rivet must be of the same material as that of the parts to be joined.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

rivet

[′riv·ət]
(design engineering)
A short rod with a head formed on one end; it is inserted through aligned holes in parts to be joined, and the protruding end is pressed or hammered to form a second head.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rivet

rivet heads
A short pin, of a malleable metal such as iron, steel, or copper, with a head at one end; used to unite two metal plates by passing it through a hole in both plates and then hammering down the point to form a second head.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The heater, usually the youngest of the team, who softened the rivets in a portable forge before picking them up with long-handled tongs and throwing them to...
To adopt rivets at pounds 1 each, please make cheques payable to Manxman Steamship Co, and send to Bill Ogle, Chairman, Manxman Steamship Co, c/o 153 Mather Avenue, Liverpool, L18 6JZ.
The rivets in question are about 13 millimeters long and about 5 mm thick each, and made from alloyed aluminum by a U.S.
American academics found many of the poorly cast wrought-iron rivets would have popped on impact, causing the hull to "unzip" allowing in water.
Tools and Supplies * Two snap clips with 1 1/2-inch loops * Two 1 1/2-inch D-rings * Two 1 1/2-inch belt slides * Awl or four-hole leather punch * Rotary leather punch * Two leather-stitching needles * Artificial sinew * Leather shears or utility knife * Scissors * Large sheets of paper * 1/4-inch rivets * Rivet setter and anvil * Flexible tape measure * Small block of beeswax * Binder clips * Square * Ruler * Permanent marker * Pencil * Hammer * Lighter or matches Some Riveting Information
Riveted connections are the most commonly used ones among the mechanical connections.
The connections between individual wall studs and tracks (top, bottom and nogging tracks) are currently fastened with rivets through the two flanges of the wall members being connected.
M2 EQUITYBITES-May 9, 2018-Chicago Rivet & Machine announces dividend of USD0.21 per share for quarter
There is no telling how many millions of pounds of rivets (rivets were measured by the pound, not by the number) Naomi and the sisterhood of Rosie's pulverized into the shape of airplanes, tanks and trucks.
Standard or custom (and customer standard) types of rivets are offered, including Blind (POP) designs, Tubular & Semi-Tubular, Solid Rivets, Rivet Nuts, Rivet Bushes, Self-Clinching Studs, Weld Studs and Self-Clinching Nuts.