roadstead


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roadstead

[′rōd‚sted]
(geography)
An area near the shore, where vessels can anchor in safety; usually a shallow indentation in the coast.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ship arrived in the Sukadana roadstead in mid-May and the Sultan gave permission for it to be brought into the river.
17, [section] 93118.2(c) (exempting "ocean-going vessel voyages that are comprised of continuous and expeditious navigation through any Regulated California Waters for the purpose of traversing such bodies of water without entering California internal or estuarine waters or calling at a port, roadstead, or terminal facility"); see also Pac.
"Sea Wind" is on roadstead near the Brazilian port Victoria, waiting for several days to enter it to be loaded.
(11) Austen refers repeatedly to the naval base Spithead, a roadstead in the English Channel between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight, at two junctures of her story.
Chinese traders in Lifau's roadstead reported that some inhabitants had even offered themselves as slaves to the Chinese in order to get food for their families.
The Administrative Court of Sicily submitted a request for a preliminary ruling to the EU court concerning interpretation of Directive 2004/35/EC on environmental liability after several petroleum and petrochemical firms with installations in the Priolo Gargallo region brought actions against decisions ordering them to clean up pollution of the Augusta roadstead.
More than 425,000 cruise ship passengers are expected be on board the cruise liners, which will berth either at Port Zante or the Deep Water Port, or drop anchor in the Basseterre Roadstead. According to the 2007/2008 Cruise Ship Itinerary released by the St Christopher Air and Sea Ports Authority (SCASPA) an estimated 426,302 cruise passengers should visit St Kitts during the months of Oct.
Salem Sound is a nasty roadstead at the best of times, full of sandy shoals and granite ledges waiting just below the surface to rip out the belly of any vessel venturing too close.
The first attempt of the CSR to seek parliamentary approval (indispensable, for no railway and associated port could be built without such sanction) fell foul of this determined opposition, its overtures formally rejected because the sea approaches to Silloth were judged too shallow to serve as an effective roadstead. Yet an acknowledged expert, James Meadows Rendel, had declared that the offshore bar offered 8.2 m of water at the highest neap tides (and 11.9 m at the highest spring tides), and controversy raged as to whether that could be turned to good account for the passage of shipping.
Warships of seven countries--Britain, France, Germany, Austro-Hungary, Italy, Russia, and the United States--did in fact anchor in the Mersin roadstead in April 1909 but refrained from landing men.