Robe

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Robe

 

a loose, floor-length garment worn over other clothing. It is the ceremonial and formal apparel of kings, the pope, and high officials of the Orthodox Church. In some countries, including Great Britain, robes are worn by judges and barristers; on ceremonial occasions, members of learned societies and academies wear robes.

References in classic literature ?
With great care he draped the robe about him; the bloody blotch that had covered the severed neck he arranged about his own head.
The latter dodged the first charge, drew a wicked-looking curved blade from beneath its red robe, spread its wings and dived for its antagonist.
Yes, dear Bud, we will gladly toil among the roots, that the fair flowers may wear their gayest robes to welcome you.
Say they are pardoned, and you have gained the love of hearts pure as the snow-white robes now folded over them.
Five minutes after he had rolled up in his robe, he opened his eyes and sat up, amazed that he was not already asleep.
He lay down again, pulled the edge of the robe around his neck and over his ear-flaps, closed his eyes, and this time fell asleep.
Here they again got a supply of fish and dogs from the natives; and two of the men were fortunate enough each to get a horse in exchange for a buffalo robe.
Instead of entering the splendid Emerald City as a respectable traveler who was entitled to a welcome and to hospitality, he was being brought in as a criminal, handcuffed and in a robe that told all he met of his deep disgrace.
Then he flashed forth his bright sword and leaped upon Will Stutely, thinking he would take him unaware; but Stutely had his own sword tightly held in his hand, beneath his robe, so he drew it forth before the constable came upon him.
He had exchanged his shirt of mail for an under tunic of dark purple silk, garnished with furs, over which flowed his long robe of spotless white, in ample folds.
It is a robe of state: Woven by a Venetian: the stuff, cut-velvet: The pattern, pomegranates: each separate seed Wrought of a pearl: the collar all of pearls, As thick as moths in summer streets at night, And whiter than the moons that madmen see Through prison bars at morning.
Buckingham threw himself at her feet, and before the queen could prevent him, kissed the hem of her robe.