rock cycle


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rock cycle

[′räk ‚sī·kəl]
(geology)
The interrelated sequence of events by which rocks are initially formed, altered, destroyed, and reformed as a result of magmatism, erosion, sedimentation, and metamorphism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This activity was done toward the end of the rock cycle unit.
The rock cycle session took place in one of the classrooms.
* Using the rock cycle to describe relationships between sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rocks and the processes that form them
Its granite is an igneous rock that was originally formed when magma deep within a volcano slowly cooled 100 million years ago (see The Rock Cycle, p.
"Recently I completed the Northern Rock cycle challenge ride of 104 gruelling miles through the rolling Northumberland hills, raising funds and awareness for Help for Heroes."
Sigrid Clift, from the Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin, also gave a presentation on the Texas Rock Cycle, an exercise demonstrating rock transformation.
Dark circles remain etched on its surface from the continued violence of our early solar system, when comets and asteroids impacted the moon and--although the rock cycle has destroyed the evidence--Earth.
In the process, old rocks are destroyed and new ones are created (see "The Rock Cycle," page 14).
Within the text, they include a civil engineering core that explores the origins of geomaterials, rock types, recognition of geomaterials, groundwater, and engineering properties of rocks, but they also cover the origins of geology, tectonic plate mechanics, the rock cycle, geological structure, boundary hazards, and geochemistry hazards.
Geological Time Actualism Rock Cycle Lithification: Sediment vs Sedimentary rock Original Horizontality of Strata Lateral Continuity of Strata Superposition of Strata Cross-cutting Relationships Principle of Inclusions Biological Evolution, Index Fossils Stratigraphic Correlation
Baxter also gives due emphasis to Hutton's conception of what is now called the "Rock Cycle"--a brilliant vision (for which the Scot cleverly found supporting field evidence) of the stability of the earth's crustal features accomplished through repeated stages of denudation, deposition, consolidation, and elevation.