rock failure

rock failure

[′räk ‚fāl·yər]
(geology)
Fracture of a rock that has been stressed beyond its ultimate strength.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Liu et al., "Experimental study on acoustic emission characteristics of rock failure under uniaxial multilevel loadings," Chinese Journal of Rock Mechanics and Engineering, vol.
[11] carried out the uniaxial compression tests on rocks and analyzed the mechanical characteristics and acoustic emission characteristics of the whole process of rock failure. Wu et al.
The study of rock fracture toughness is one of the current frequent directions of research in the area of rock failure. The present paper describes the effects of parameters influencing the resultant properties of rock materials (bending rate, rock moisture) in fracture toughness measurements of different kinds of rocks.
The rock failure process always consists of four stages: microcrack closure, elastic deformation, crack growth and propagation, and final failure.
In the final analysis, rock failure is a state instability phenomenon driven by energy [1], and the dynamic failure of rock is a result of the rapid release of elastic energy aggregated inside a rock when failure reaches the intensity limit [2-4].
Research concerning rock failure and supporting technology in efflorescent oxidation zones is limited, and findings are preliminary.
The ultimate strengths (the maximum stress in the case of rock failure in a short-term compression experiment) of 1# and 2# samples were 81.17 MPa and 82.88 MPa, respectively.
In the past decade, the discrete element method has been the most common numerical calculation method used to analyze rock failure and widely applied in research on cracking and failure in brittle rock-like materials.
Study of the AE characteristics from small-scale rock failure to large-scale rock dynamic disasters as well as precursor laws of microseism involves the size effect of coal and rock mass.
[95, 96] extended NMM to study wave propagation across rockmasses and developed a continuum-discontinuum-coupled model to simulate rock failure under dynamic loads.
A damage material and erosion criteria were used in the code to dominate the rock failure and to delete the elements.
Additionally, based on the rock failure analysis process, the numerical direct shear test was performed to investigate the shear behavior of intermittent joints with different geometrical parameters.