Rock Wallabies


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Rock Wallabies

 

(Petrogale), a genus of mammals of the family Macropodidae. The body is 50–80 cm long, and the tail is 40–70 cm long. Adult animals weigh from 3 to 9 kg. Rock wallabies are sandy-colored; the basic color of the top of the body is gray-brown, the underparts are light yellow or white, and the ends of the paws, snout, and tail are darker. There are two species: P. penicillata and P. xanthopus, which are distinguished by their coloring. Rock wallabies are found all over Australia and on the small adjoining islands. They live in mountains and rocky deserts. They are swift runners, jump as far as 4 m, and adroitly clamber over rocks. They are herbivorous. During arid spells they can go for long periods without water by living on the moisture contained in their food. Rock wallabies reproduce once a year. They are not numerous.

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Following the translocation, a week of trapping will occur to determine the genetic diversity in locally born rock wallabies and if the unique Kalbarri genes are being retained.
The goals were to (1) identify the most successful methods of reintroducing captive-bred rock wallabies; (2) determine how individuals and the colony as a whole adjust once released; and (3) examine the effect of environmental variables and sympatric species on the establishment, ecology, and physiology of the YFRW.
"At Kalbarri National Park, this baiting directly assists the repopulation of black-flanked rock wallabies, which were rediscovered in the park last year after being considered locally extinct for 20 years," Mr Jacob said.
Twenty-three black-flanked rock wallabies were moved from the Wheatbelt to Kalbarri National Park yesterday, to boost the tiny population of the threatened species that was discovered in the park last year.
About a quarter of the area (8,550 hectares) will be declared as Payrrape Nature Refuge, which will protect the sandstone escarpments providing habitat for threatened species such as ghost bats, Cape York rock wallabies and northern quolls.
Black-flanked rock wallabies are only found on two Western Australian islands and a few isolated mainland locations, including seven small sites in the Wheatbelt.