Rock Wallabies

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Rock Wallabies

 

(Petrogale), a genus of mammals of the family Macropodidae. The body is 50–80 cm long, and the tail is 40–70 cm long. Adult animals weigh from 3 to 9 kg. Rock wallabies are sandy-colored; the basic color of the top of the body is gray-brown, the underparts are light yellow or white, and the ends of the paws, snout, and tail are darker. There are two species: P. penicillata and P. xanthopus, which are distinguished by their coloring. Rock wallabies are found all over Australia and on the small adjoining islands. They live in mountains and rocky deserts. They are swift runners, jump as far as 4 m, and adroitly clamber over rocks. They are herbivorous. During arid spells they can go for long periods without water by living on the moisture contained in their food. Rock wallabies reproduce once a year. They are not numerous.

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known tjana-mpa 3.PL-GEN For their children, up above, following the aeroplane, their children (c) Ngunytjun-nya tjana-ya ngalya-paka-ra nyina-nyi Mother-ACC 3.PL-3.PL this.way-get up-SER be-PRS The mothers, sat after coming out (d) Panya tjana-nya-ya katu-ya mira-ni that.known 3.PL-ACC-3.PL above-3.PL watch-PRS they watched the sky up above Another verse tells of the rock wallaby mothers crying for their children, searching to no avail:
This parallel was made explicit by one Anangu women as she noted the observable similarities and differences between the black-footed rock wallaby and the yellow-footed surrogate mothers she saw at Monarto zoo.
During the 1994 National Rock Wallaby Symposium, the Adelaide Zoo received unanimous support for a trial release of YFRW.
This reintroduction can serve as a model for other rock wallaby reintroductions.
Students were involved with radio-tracking, compiling issues of Rock Wallaby News, producing a model of the sanctuary, and inventing the "Wallaby Hop" for a school dance.
The future looks bright for the yellow-footed rock wallaby. The captive population is sustained by collaborations between Australian and North American species managers, and the wild population is sustained by feral animal control, possible future reintroductions, and other in situ conservation efforts.
I would like to thank Andy Sharp, University of Queensland/NSW NPWS; Suzy Barlow, Western Plains Zoo; and Steven Lapidge, University of Sydney, for their guidance, encouragement, and willingness to share their knowledge and experience with a rock wallaby enthusiast from across the ocean.
Studies on the yellow-footed rock wallaby distribution in South Australia.
The biology and management of the yellow-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus) in NSW.
Agriculture and Food Minister Terry Redman said the tiny black-flanked rock wallaby populations in the central Wheatbelt were extremely susceptible to attack by foxes.
Environment Minister Bill Marmion said black-flanked rock wallaby sites in the Wheatbelt had experienced major population declines over the past two years.