rocket thrust

rocket thrust

[′räk·ət ‚thrəst]
(aerospace engineering)
The thrust of a rocket engine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the research is to establish a particular ratio between rocket weight and the amount of algal fuel that provides rocket thrust, Bano explained.
The situation has come to an end and we have only one choice, either to fully succumb to the momentum that actually brought us in this situation and fall in the abyss, or stay awake and react like a rocket thrust and propel beyond the death they have planned for us, and shoot for the stars and fight for life, writes the author.
If the black holes are of unequal mass, then some of the energy may radiate more strongly in one direction, providing the equivalent of a rocket thrust. The imbalance of forces would have ejected the merged black hole from the center at speeds of millions of kilometers per hour, resulting in the rarity of a galaxy without a central black hole.
The rocket thrust pushes up, but at the same time, gravity pulls the spaceship down toward Earth.
He said the rocket's engines would have a thrust of between 120 and 140 tonnes, four times greater than the rocket thrust used to launch Iran's first satellite into space in February 2009.
Remaining chapters discuss the formation of energetic pyrolants (metal-based pyrotechnic compositions), combustion propagation of pyrolants, emission from combustion products, transient combustion of propellants and pyrolants, rocket thrust modulation, and ducted rocket propulsion.
Should the rocket move outside its planned flight path, the Range Safety and Telemetry System is cable of providing the mechanisms to safely terminate the rocket thrust. Two separate mobile vans house two identical Range Safety and Telemetry Systems.
Conventional jet power would take them most of the way with a later rocket thrust to take them over the edge of space and give mind-blowing views of the Earth below.
November 11: A rocket thrust sends Mars Express on its final course to the Red Planet, 12.5 million miles away;
This magnetic field interacts with the gas to accelerate gas particles, thereby creating rocket thrust.
Because of dissimilarities in the nature of the rocket thrust they produce, electric motors and their chemical counterparts accomplish their propulsive tasks quite differently.
Atlantis, lighter in weight than the three other shuttlecraft, has also been strenghened to handle the higher rocket thrust required for launchings to polar or near-polar orbits from the West Coast, where a Defense Department shuttle-launch facility is now being built at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.