scareware

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scareware

A warning message that pops up from a website that claims the user's computer is currently contaminated or not running properly. Also called "fake antivirus" and "rogue antivirus," scareware is a dishonest attempt to cause a user to purchase antivirus, registry cleaner or some other software that repairs problems or enhances performance.

Worse yet, scareware may be used to entice the user to install phony software that implants a real virus or some other malware. In either case, the dire warning frightens people into taking action. See ransomware, spyware and wares.
References in periodicals archive ?
Criminals and hackers are known to use these platforms to distribute malware, push rogue antivirus scams and phishing campaigns to lure their victims.
The Trend Micro highlighted the example of a rogue antivirus app known as Virus Shield receiving a 4.
Delta Airlines[R] similarly had their brand misappropriated in a spam campaign meant to infect users with Sirefef and rogue antivirus software.
In June, GFI threat researchers observed two fresh spam campaigns linking to Blackhole exploits which posed as confirmation emails from Twitter similarly had their brand misappropriated in a spam campaign meant to infect users with Sirefef and rogue antivirus software.
Additionally, June saw scammers distributing rogue antivirus software by taking advantage of search traffic related to popular Pokemon [TM] video games, as well as luring users to fill out seemingly endless fake questionnaires.
Home Protect is a new rogue antivirus application having the aim to steal your money.
The new release introduces new features, including Intrusion Guard and Privacy Tools, as well as the ability to detect and prevent installation of rogue antivirus programs.
For example, Symantec has already observed some rogue antivirus vendors selling rebranded copies of free third-party antivirus software as their own offerings.
lt;p>Another accelerating security trend is the wave of criminals selling rogue antivirus software.
Cybercriminals are increasingly creating poised search results related to the hottest news in order to direct consumers to malicious websites with recent scams, such as:Blackhat SEO Quick to Abuse Farrah Fawcett DeathScammers Ride on H1N1 Global PandemicAir France Flight 447 Search Results Lead to Rogue Antivirus
GFI([R]) Software Warns of New Variations of Rogue Antivirus Programs Often Distributed Through Spam Carrying the Blackhole Exploit
In May, users also faced the continued threat of rogue antivirus attacks around the Web, including a fraudulent Brad Pitt fan club website.