roll


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roll,

in aviation: see airfoilairfoil,
surface designed to develop a desired force by reaction with a fluid, especially air, that is flowing across the surface. For example, the fixed wing surfaces of an airplane produce lift, which opposes gravity.
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roll

[rōl]
(geology)
A primary sedimentary structure produced by deformation involving subaqueous slump or vertical foundering.
(mechanics)
Rotational or oscillatory movement of an aircraft or similar body about a longitudinal axis through the body; it is called roll for any degree of such rotation.
(mechanical engineering)
A cylinder mounted in bearings; used for such functions as shaping, crushing, moving, or printing work passing by it.
(mining engineering)
(textiles)
A continuous strand made by rolling, rubbing, or twisting fibers.

roll

1. A rounded strip fastened to, and running along, the ridge of a roof.
2. In a roof covered

roll

rollclick for a larger image
The motion of an aircraft about its longitudinal axis. The rolling motion is controlled primarily by ailerons.

roll

1. a cylinder used to flatten something; roller
2. a very rapid beating of the sticks on a drum
3. a flight manoeuvre in which an aircraft makes one complete rotation about its longitudinal axis without loss of height or change in direction
4. a throw of dice
5. a bookbinder's tool having a brass wheel, used to impress a line or repeated pattern on the cover of a book
References in classic literature ?
Not until a third of the way up, as the Arangi rolled in a sea and recovered with a jerk, did he slip and fall.
With a conciliating, apologetic bob of his tail, he trotted on up wind and came upon Skipper on his back, rolled in a blanket so that only his head stuck out, and sound asleep.
At the old man's word and outstretched arm, the roll of the drum was hushed at once, and the advancing line stood still.
He felt for the bank roll in the pocket in which he had been accustomed to carry it.
"Does 'whoa' mean to stop?" asked the Saw-Horse, in a surprised voice, as it rolled its eyes upward to look at the boy.
A tremendous place is close before us, the black driver rolls his eyes, screws his mouth up very round, and looks straight between the two leaders, as if he were saying to himself, 'We have done this often before, but NOW I think we shall have a crash.' He takes a rein in each hand; jerks and pulls at both; and dances on the splashboard with both feet
Every appearance it had then presented, bore the expression of being swelled; and the height to which the breakers rose, and, looking over one another, bore one another down, and rolled in, in interminable hosts, was most appalling.
His pale waxen face was still freckled and his eyes were rolled back.
When the waves began to tumble and toss and to grow bigger and bigger the ship rolled up and down, and tipped sidewise--first one way and then the other--and was jostled around so roughly that even the sailor-men had to hold fast to the ropes and railings to keep themselves from being swept away by the wind or pitched headlong into the sea.
All those ears of corn bent, and became waves more agitated than those of the ocean, which rolled from the extremities to the center, and beat, like the tides, against the hedge of archers who surrounded the gibbets.
I climbed upon the bars-and the whole cage rolled over on top of me.
Sweet words falter to and fro -- Though the great River rolls between.