roll axis

roll axis

[′rōl ‚ak·səs]
(mechanics)
A longitudinal axis through an aircraft, rocket, or similar body, about which the body rolls.
References in periodicals archive ?
The point O is the intersection of vertical line passing through the centroid of vehicle and roll axis.
The largest miniature models for example, have dynamic load ratings in excess of 16,600 N (LWLG25) and moment load ratings over 320 N-m (MLFG42) in the roll axis.
Existing lens-based stablizers can only correct for vibrations on two axes of motions, the pitch axis and yaw axis, even though the most common type of unwanted shaking during photography actually takes place on the roll axis.
During automatic entering of the UV into workspace it is necessary that roll axis [X.
Incorporating new technologies, Butler National designed, manufactured and obtained Federal Aviation Administration Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) approval of a replacement rate sensor for use by the autopilot on the roll axis and yaw axis of the applicable Learjet 31/35/35A/36/36A/C-21A and 55 Series airplanes, and on the yaw axis on the Learjet Model 24/25/28/29 Series airplanes.
Reduced control effectiveness at slower speeds also impacts our ability to keep the airplane level about its roll axis.
They also displayed the greatest agility around the roll axis, initiating voluntary casting maneuvers and correcting for lateral disturbances mainly by rolling considerably to change course and correct their flight path for the disturbances induced by the wind, but they still experienced significant translational and rotational fluctuations as compared to flight in smooth flow.
The Liebherr car body positioning system centers the car actively on its roll axis, and also acts as a damper.
FAA wants Boeing 757 operators to perform corrective actions The Federal Aviation Administration has proposed that operators of Boeing 757s prevent possible roll axis motions by performing corrective actions within the next five years.
A single-axis system controls the roll axis of the aircraft only, essentially leveling the wings and driving the ailerons to a selected heading and, if interfaced, tracking or intercepting nav and GPS signals.
This is achieved by a high roll axis tolerance, which doesn't pitch occupants around like rag dolls.