romance

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romance

[O.Fr.,=something written in the popular language, i.e., a Romance languageRomance languages,
group of languages belonging to the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Italic languages). Also called Romanic, they are spoken by about 670 million people in many parts of the world, but chiefly in Europe and the Western Hemisphere.
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]. The roman of the Middle Ages was a form of chivalric and romantic literature widely diffused throughout Europe from the 11th cent. With the Provençal troubadourstroubadours
, aristocratic poet-musicians of S France (Provence) who flourished from the end of the 11th cent. through the 13th cent. Many troubadours were noblemen and crusader knights; some were kings, e.g.
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 the roman was a form of narrative, originally sung but later recited before courts. The trouvèrestrouvères
, medieval poet-musicians of central and N France, fl. during the later 12th and the 13th cent. The trouvères imitated the troubadours of the south.
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 lengthened these into the chansons de gestechansons de geste
[Fr.,=songs of deeds], a group of epic poems of medieval France written from the 11th through the 13th cent. Varying in length from 1,000 to 20,000 lines, assonanced or (in the 13th cent.
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 and the romans d'aventures, or romances of love and adventure. It is from the latter class that the modern romance descends (see novelnovel,
in modern literary usage, a sustained work of prose fiction a volume or more in length. It is distinguished from the short story and the fictional sketch, which are necessarily brief.
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).

Bibliography

See studies by A. B. Taylor (1930, repr. 1969), G. Beer (1970), and E. Vinaver (1971).

romance

1. a narrative in verse or prose, written in a vernacular language in the Middle Ages, dealing with strange and exciting adventures of chivalrous heroes
2. any similar narrative work dealing with events and characters remote from ordinary life
3. the literary genre represented by works of these kinds
4. (in Spanish literature) a short narrative poem, usually an epic or historical ballad
5. a lyrical song or short instrumental composition having a simple melody
References in periodicals archive ?
Holiday romancers John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John star in Randal Kleiser's musical crowd-pleaser which makes wonderful use of a mixture of energy and innocence to overcome its inevitable script deficiencies.
The rugged coastal castle is famous for being the birthplace of Arthur, according to Geoffrey of Monmouth and subsequent romancers.
Any big-screen love story worth its weight in schmaltz requires not only two great romancers but also a great wedge that drives the lovers apart and keeps the audience sniffling.
Many there are amongst us who obviously prefer the safety of pure illusion or the myths of romancers who would have us reside in a dreamland or in reverie, drifting endlessly within the gates of Eden.
Faithful romancers won't be surprised by Ray's women's fiction debut.
Apart from a special case, the Continuations of Le Conte del Graal, it is shown how the verse romancers responded to this challenge.
In fact, by redeeming Zora's purity, Du Bois envisions a happy ending few romancers would dare.
He continued to write poetry and drama, and in 1894 his first successful play, Les Romanesques (The Romancers or The Fantasticks), was produced.
In telling and retelling the story of Arthur and in attempting to produce a coherent narrative out of diverse sources, the medieval romancers introduced Christian and other elements, not originally Arthurian, thus further confusing its origin.
That's because commercial local romancers, such as smash hit "Love Manual 2," are driving the market, giving local pics a boffo 40% share, while arty imports have been flopping.