root component

root component

[′rüt kəm′pō·nənt]
(computer science)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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All components except root component have a parent component and all component logics form a tree structure, as shown in Fig.
The level of root component is 0., the level of the child node will increase by 1 on the basis of its parent's level when it is created.
In the underground root component of a walnut-soybean intercropping system, 37.3% (dry weight is 40.0 g) of the total FRDW of walnut distributed in the soil layer 0-20 cm, and 72.8% (dry weight is 32.3 g) of the total FRDW of soybean also concentrated in the soil layer 0-20 cm (Fig.
They noted when each root component first appeared and tracked its growth.
Each tree of F is called a component, and the root component is the tree containing the root vertex.
For instance, an enriched R-tree is either reduced to a single leaf, or consists of a root component (say, with k incident edges) in which each non-root incident edge is replaced either by a bud, or an enriched R-tree, or an enriched S-tree.
* "Painter" has a root component providing information about the painter and a number of paintings ([ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE C OMITTED] in the HDM sidebar).
* "Picture-Type" also has a root component and a number of paintings.
What is the size [S.sub.n] of the root component, that is, the component containing the vertex 1?
It signifies genetically predisposed neurological struggles with piecing together the root components of words, decoding them and sounding them out into cohesive units.
To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that the biological activity of scopoletin extracted from the cassava root components was evaluated on strains isolated from maize in storage.
Also, it offers "a matrix for understanding Gothic criminology as a theoretical perspective, by tracing its root components within strands of postmodern criminology and Gothic literary and film theory" (13).