root penetration

root penetration

[′rüt ‚pen·ə‚trā·shən]
(metallurgy)
The depth of penetration of the weld metal into the root of a joint.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Again you won't have root penetration so personally I think you're better pulling them out.
Because these tillers rarely penetrate deeper than 8 inches into the soil, they create a hard layer of soil just beyond the tiller's reach, which forms a barrier for root penetration and may inhibit plant growth.
If the simulator is connected to a smart board or a projector, however, the teacher can show what a work angle looks like, complete a weld and play back the weld from the perspective of the root, indicating root penetration.
This difference may be partly associated with alterations in the root environment, which was verified through the root penetration mechanical resistance (Figure 1A), with the presence of a compacted layer at the 0.1m depth for the non-tilled system, which was significantly reduced by the deep tillage process.
Effect of root-dip treatment with fungal filtrates on root penetration, development and reproduction of M.
Made of corrosion-resistant, 316 stainless steel; EPDM rubber and NBR compression sealing, the system effectively repairs longitudinal cracks, transverse cracks, radial cracks, broken fragments, root penetration and socket end leaks.
Moreover, this plough pan is found to be shallower than usual rooting depth and thus may act as a hurdle for roots either due to lesser porosity or higher root penetration resistance (Bruand et al., 2004; Shahzad et al., 2016a).
The supply of water to plants, besides reducing soil resistance to root penetration (Rosolem et al., 1999), helps in the control of plant temperature and absorption of nutrients, and in the ion-root contact through both mass flow and root interception and diffusion (Rosolem et al., 2003).
In the context of root growth, soil strength is a relevant measure of compaction, because it shows the resistance that a given soil has to root penetration.
The lines as indicated by the thread root penetration are deformations of the pipe by the thread die forming the root of the thread.