root zone


Also found in: Acronyms.

root zone

[′rüt ‚zōn]
(geology)
The area where a low-angle thrust fault steepens and descends into the crust.
The source of the root of a fold nappe.

root zone

The starting point in the domain name system (DNS) on the Internet. See root server.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mulch should be kept over the root zone as it expands, but avoid planting flowers and other garden plants in that area so as not to disturb the root system.
The root zone was defined as being 20 cm horizontal distance from the drip line and 60 cm in depth (Fig.
The root zone is modeled with the Thornthwaite-Mather procedure and includes the loss of soil water by evapotranspiration.
Taking a closer look at the spatial distribution of normalized RMSE differences in the NRT GVF case in Oklahoma (Figure 3), stations in northwestern Oklahoma where the RMSD is as high as 18% present overall improvement by 2-4% for surface SM estimates and 4-6% for the root zone. On the other hand, stations over southeastern Oklahoma showing less improvement or slight degradation are the ones where small RMSD exists between climatological and NRT GVF.
For a smaller vineyard of about 20 acres with uniform soils, Beck said a couple of simple tensiometers at both ends of the root zone could be sufficient.
Leaf Zone: This varies even more dramatically than the root zone does.
USDA-ARS scientists and ASABE members Rob Malone and Dan Jaynes with Tom Kaspar are using the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) to assess how winter rye cover crops in corn-soybean rotations could mitigate nitrate loads in field drainage water.
This implies rivers have less sediment, more water will be captured in the crop root zone. It translates to lower treatment costs and lower service charges to the city dwellers," says Fred Kizito, senior scientist for soils, water and landscapes at CIAT.
He said the rainfall will sustain the much needed soil moisture in the root zone and would help the farmers saving their extra inputs in terms of watering the crop.
Upriver in Iowa, Agricultural Research Service scientists Rob Malone, Tom Kaspar, and Dan Jaynes are using the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) to assess how using winter rye cover crops in corn-soybean rotations could mitigate nitrate loads in field drainage water.
Variation in the root zone temperature was reported to influence plant growth and development by modifying some major physiological responses such as hormonal balance, shoot meristematic activity (McMaster et al., 2003), plant growth, carbon partitioning, and photosynthetic rate (Monje et al., 2007).