rostrum

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rostrum

1. a platform or dais in front of an orchestra on which the conductor stands
2. another word for ram (sense 4)
3. the prow or beak of an ancient Roman ship
4. Biology Zoology a beak or beaklike part
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rostrum

 

(1) In fish, the anterior part of the neurocranium, located in front of the olfactory capsules. The rostrum is especially prominent as an integral cartilaginous process in Acipen-seridae, for example, in the stellate sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) and Scaphirhyncus, and in chondrichthians, for example, in the sawfish and saw shark. In the smooth hound and other fish the rostrum is represented by three separate outgrowths. In the sawfish and saw shark large cutaneous teeth (placoid scales) are located along the sides of the rostrum; in these animals, the rostrum resembles a saw and serves as a weapon of defense and attack. In the majority of Batoidei the anterior edges of the pectoral fins are attached to the rostrum. The rostrum is reduced in many contemporary bony fishes and in terrestrial vertebrates.

(2) In reptiles and birds, the anterior process of the basisphe-noid bone. The rostrum is formed by the concrescence of the integumentary sphenoid bone to the basisphenoid bone.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

rostrum

[′rä·strəm]
(biology)
A beak or beaklike process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rostrum

A platform, elevated area, pulpit, or the like for addressing an audience.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cypselae distinctly rostrate to attenuate at the apex.
Elliptic-ovate glabrous anther with cordate base and rostrate connective, dorsifixed, 0.4-0.5 cm long, glabrous thin filament 0.5-1.0 cm long and 0.05 cm wide.
Cypselae rostrate at the apex, pubescent; pappus with barbellate, capillary bristles.
Cypselae constricted to shortly rostrate at the apex, glabrous to pubescent; pappus of scabrid, basally connate, capillary bristles.
Cypselae truncate to rostrate at the apex, glabrous to pubescent; pappus of capillary bristles to paleaceous, scabrose to plumose, equal in length, rarely pappus absent.
Inflorescences interfoliar, erect to ascending, branched to one order, prophyll short, bicarinate, fibrous, hidden in leaf bases, peduncular bract prominent, rostrate, densely spiny adaxially, glabrous abaxially, peduncle densely spiny, rachis shorter than peduncle, not spiny, rachis and rachillae covered with a dense wooly-white tomentum, rachillae entirely covered by staminate flowers, these shallowly sunken in pits, pistillate flowers directly inserted at the base of rachilla or directly on main rachis in between staminate rachillae and without evident connection with them.
Cypselae rostrate, slightly constricted to attenuate at the apex, glabrous to pubescent; pappus of plumose, capillary bristles, occasionally barbellate to ciliate.
Cypselae constricted at the apex to longly rostrate, pubescent; pappus of scabrid, capillary bristles.
Follicles generally thin walled (a stout capsule in secondarily syncarpous species); seeds flat, linear to ellipsoid or ovate, the testa glabrous or hairy with micropylar (sometimes rostrate) coma.
of Prestonia, but splitting apart at maturity along suture); seeds mostly linear but broadly ovate in Parsonsia and Artia, testa glabrous, with micropylar (often rostrate) coma.