rotational landslide

rotational landslide

[rō′tā·shən·əl ′lan‚slīd]
(geology)
A landslide in which shearing takes place on a well-defined, curved shear surface, concave upward in cross section, producing a backward rotation in the displaced mass.
References in periodicals archive ?
A slump is a rotational landslide (or earthslide) that moves downhill with minimal deformation along a concave failure plane (Goudie 1994; Varnes 1958).
One characteristic of rotational landslides is reverse slopes which are responsible for the presence of an elongated pool (Van Den Eeckhaut et al.
Translational and rotational landslides are mainly distinguished on the basis of the geometry of slip surface (Varnes, 1978).
Rotational landslides are very frequent movements of slope worldwide, which largely affect cases of clayey materials with some degree of consolidation.
Large rotational landslides are frequent on UK coastal cliffs and occasionally they affect layers of 'weak rocks or strong soils' under saturated conditions.
Under the Bocono Fault's tectonic, it occurred a seismic movement (4.2 Richter) on 17/11/1998 to the east of the study area, producing various rotational landslides after small explosions by the rocks descompressive effect.