rotational transformation

rotational transformation

[rō′tā·shən·əl ‚tranz·fər′mā·shən]
(crystallography)
A type of crystal transformation that is a change from an ordered phase to a partially disordered phase by rotation of groups of atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proposed heuristic is a combination of greedy depth first search, unreachable vertex, and rotational transformation heuristics.
Rotational Transformation. Rotational transformation [11] and its variations are found to be powerful heuristics for finding Hamiltonian cycle.
The procedure of rotational transformation is summarized below.
In the proposed algorithm, rotational transformation is used for two purposes.
In the first case highest degree end of the path is selected for rotational transformation since it increases the probability of getting a new end.
If the initial path created is not Hamiltonian (less number of vertices than the total number of vertices), then select the highest degree end of the initial path for rotational transformation. This is to increase the probability for getting a new end vertex for extending the path further to create a Hamiltonian path.
Otherwise, apply rotational transformation to the smallest degree vertex repeatedly until getting a new end vertex which can be connected to the other end vertex to form the Hamiltonian cycle.
[C.sup.t.sub.b] denotes the rotational transformation matrix, also called the strapdown matrix.
where [C.sub.z,[gamma]] denotes the rotational transformation matrix around the z-axis with rotation angle [gamma].
One can consider this 4-D rotational transformation as the result of a bi-quaternion operation [14], or equivalently, a bi-spinor or Ivanenko-Landau-Kahler spinor or Dirac-Kahler spinor operation.
The rotational behavior of Einsteinian space is discussed in the context of rotational transformation between the Schwarzschild metric and the Kerr metric obtained for weak field within the limit of (r[omega]) < c.
Here b, d are constant coefficients of rotational transformations; vector n is the normal vector to the plane.