rotor head


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

rotor head

rotor head
i. That part of the rotor hub to which the rotor blades are attached. Sometimes called a spider. The same as a rotor hub.
ii. When used as slang, it means a helicopter pilot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sprinkler systems usually consist of four basic components; a programmable timer or controller, irrigation valves, underground piping and spray or rotor heads.
The probe centres on the main rotor head, its suspension bar assembly and the main gearbox.
If you change or move the flight controls while performing maintenance, the rotor blades and rotor head pitch varying housing are adjusted to a pitched angled position.
Our first Functional Check Flight (FCF) ground turn following the inspection resulted in main rotor head vibrations reading of 0.13 inches per second on the Automatic Track And Balance Set (ATABS), a value well within the established parameters.
The core of AS3X technology is a sophisticated, 3-axis digital sensor that stabilizes the rotor head and functions as a heading hold gyro.
During the subsequent startup, the air crewman noticed an unusual object hanging from the main rotor head and alerted the helicopter aircraft commander (HAC).
They will have the same drive train, rotor head, rail boom, avionics, software and controls.
Pre-award audits, using the PDIS, disclosed all the purchase history, involving all parts used in the manufacture of rotor head assemblies and strap assemblies that were the subject of two delivery orders subjected to price negotiation.
The AAIB's report said two items of significance were discovered amongst wreckage on the sea bed - the fractured blade and evidence that the gearbox and the rotor head had broken away from the fuselage mountings.
The spinning rotor head can be moved or tilted from vertical to horizontal positions, allowing for angled operation in tight-fit conditions.
The first significant improvement - if one excepts the advent of the turbine - was probably achieved by France's SNIAS company (now Aerospatiale) who exploited to the full the properties of elastomers to reduce the number of parts of the rotor head. The resulting Starflex rotor was actually killing several birds with one stone: not only were the number of parts and hence the manufacturing and maintenance costs as well as weights cut down, but most important for military applications, the high reliability thus achieved permitted a virtual all-time readiness of the rotor thanks to the "on-condition" maintenance concept.