rotoscoping


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rotoscoping

Creating animated characters by tracing an action movie with real actors frame by frame. Performed via the computer today, rotoscoping was originally accomplished in the early 1900s by projecting each movie frame onto a frosted glass easel, from which the illustrator traced and redrew the image.

Rotoscoping can be used to create actual cartoons or to create cartoon-like movies in which the actors are recognizable and the venues seem real, but the entire motion picture has a cartoon-like quality.

Adding Cartoons
Rotoscoping is also used to superimpose cartoon images into a real movie, where cartoon-drawn people, animals and objects intermix with human characters.
References in periodicals archive ?
"A lot of times we end up doing rotoscoping for packs when clients say that the offer has changed or a pack design has changed.
In New York Times, Dargis praises Linklater's animation technique called rotoscoping. Rotoscoping means that motions and live-action images, previously traced by ink and paint, are now sketched by software (10).
The dynamism and material energy characterizing Dunning's film are to be found in Haroun's voyage on the back of the mechanical Hoopoe, whilst the rotoscoping of some of the animated scenes in the film correspond to the kaleidoscopic vision of the multicoloured multiform waters of the Sea of Stories.
Corriveau uses rotoscoping to produce outlines of the actors playing HI and H2.
Rotoscoping is an animation technique, to display the successive frames of a scene.
This practice can also be accomplished relatively cost-effectively, since the FX for the original shows tended to be conceived as discrete moments of spectacle(14) and can, with relative ease, be isolated and replaced using digital editing, rotoscoping and CGI technologies.
"They need to allow the object to pass behind wires and buildings (a tedious editing process we call rotoscoping), keep the object's size correct when the camera zooms in and out, degrade the object's image properly when zooming in, and add realistic effects, such as image wobbling."
The second section of the work addresses subjects such as color correction and keying, Rotoscoping and paint, camera effects and optics, and HDR, and a final set of chapters explores creative examples such as light improvements, changing scene backgrounds, and environments and the addition of explosions and pyrotechnics.
In films such as Gulls and Buoys (1972), Fuji (1974), and TZ (1978), he made incomparable new use of the tired-out and nearly forgotten animation technique of rotoscoping, using felt-tip markers to trace the successive contours of movements caught in film footage.
Rather than offering a tutorial, Christiansen focuses on key techniques used by leading effects studios, e.g., color correction, rotoscoping, and motion tracking; some advanced tools (such as 32-bit HDR compositing and Color Management); workflow; and shots to re-create using his tips.
"Jan Karski & the Lords of Humanity" will employ animation techniques such as rotoscoping intertwined with archival footage, including authentic voice-over of Karski as well as modern-day documentary scenes and interviews.
The track will also covers the challenges of working with the stereo footage from a compositing perspective when attempting to do keying, rotoscoping, plate cleanup, convergence adjustment, correction of color and polarization mismatch and camera tracking.