rough air

rough air

[′rəf ′er]
(aerospace engineering)
An aviation term for turbulence encountered in flight.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And the wider the area covered by the Airmet, the more likely it is that some genuinely rough air will be in there somewhere.
China Eastern Airlines Flight MU774 from Paris was bound for the southwestern Chinese city of Kunming when it hit approximately 10 minutes of rough air.
She expects transactions will start closing faster once the industry has navigated this "rough air."
The airline said the plane that took off from New York's LaGuardia Airport was less than hour from landing Friday in Miami when it hit rough air. Airline spokesman Casey Norton said passengers' seatbelt lights were on at the time.
[...] I remember one night, headed to Europe, hitting some unusually rough air about halfway across the Atlantic.
The best description of flying in rough air, in bad weather, is the one about the Devil flying from Hell to earth in his body.
Even so, the upstart carriers face more rough air ahead as diplomatic tensions between Tokyo and neighbours China and South Korea weigh on travel demand between the regional rivals.
"I've been on planes that have been struck by lightning and hit some pretty rough air.
It's the sort of rough air that would have me, the classic nervous passenger, uttering prayers and tightening the seat belt but Denzel's pilot calmly shrugs it all off.
"I've been on planes that have been struck by lightning and hit some pretty rough air. You know, the time to worry about flying is when you're on the ground," he says.