round off


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round off

[′rau̇n‚dȯf]
(mathematics)
To truncate the least significant digit or digits of a numeral, and adjust the remaining numeral to be as close as possible to the original number.

round off

The act of holding an aircraft parallel to the ground and at a very low height above the ground when landing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chris His second pass was just as exciting, consisting of round off whip, double twisting double tuck somersault, three whips flick double twisting double tuck somersault to qualify in second place into the finals.
And for the next time-step the round off error is estimated as
The frame and grips are altered to round off the bottom along with the mainspring housing.
So this week I'm going to have a blast at a few Chiantis (with or without international varieties) and round off my Saturday night rather than the wine.
With time running away from Redcar, Billingham broke again through Aaron Sinclair who unselfishly laid it to Jaques, who neatly finished to round off the game and start the celebrations.
It would be easier to gain consumers' understanding and pass on the 10 yen flat to product prices, because we would have to round off those higher prices with decimal places stemming from the tax rise to the nearest whole number,'' the official said.
Restaurants and hairdressers are reportedly suspected of increasing prices too much and some complaints also concern the way some shops round off the prices on the receipts.
When he involves the dancers in a work derived from contact improvisation, he knows how to round off the found shapes, how to give them rhythm and momentum.
The curved elevations have a refinement and transparency and the bifurcated, tail fin top (memorably described in the British press as a pair of `erotic gherkins') is a spirited response to the problem of how to round off such a dominating structure.
Its novel features make it particularly efficient for solving a variety of numerical problems ordinarily plagued with errors because of the way conventional computers express and round off numbers.