routine library

routine library

[rü′tēn ‚lī‚brer·ē]
(computer science)
Ordered set of standard and proven computer routines by which problems or parts of problems may be solved.
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These products were created to take advantage of computers to automate the routine library tasks that were much less effective when performed manually The early automation systems enabled libraries to more efficiently describe and control their collections, and they also provided library patrons with much more powerful tools to locate materials.
Routine library staff meetings provided a forum for discussing renovations and airing staff concerns about how the renovations would affect staff.
Table 4 shows that 40 to 50 percent of the computers are used for administrative functions and Internet access, while a much smaller number are used for routine library functions.
Voluntary library workers need to assist with the performing of routine library tasks and the delivery of the various services and outreach programs to the community.
As technology platforms that automate routine library activities, efficiency and practical functionality prevail over innovation.
Librarians must give critical thought to this phenomenon with the intent of implementing it in routine library services to users.
These enhanced systems go beyond just providing computer-assisted automation for routine library tasks; they can now provide evidence and analysis to help libraries adjust the way they perform their work, improve efficiency, and make better use of their financial and human resources to maximize the impact of their collections and services.
The change from manual processing of routine library tasks to using computers to automate them was certainly transformational, but it only represented the beginning of many iterations of technology in libraries that have transpired since.
This infrastructure was high-tech for the day, providing automation features to sup port the routine library workflows inherent in the restricted model access of library materials considered necessary at that time.
But we can't let the current focus on the front-end interfaces make us complacent about the software and systems that we use to automate routine library functions.

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