row

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row

1
1. Chiefly Brit a street, esp a narrow one lined with identical houses
2. Maths a horizontal linear arrangement of numbers, quantities, or terms, esp in a determinant or matrix
3. a horizontal rank of squares on a chessboard or draughtboard

row

2
1. an act, instance, period, or distance of rowing
2. an excursion in a rowing boat

row

[]
(computer science)
The characters, or corresponding bits of binary-coded characters, in a computer word.
Equipment which simultaneously processes the bits of a character, the characters of a word, or corresponding bits of binary-coded characters in a word.
Corresponding positions in a group of columns.

row

row

(1) A horizontal set of data or components. In a graph, it is called the "x-axis." Contrast with column.

(2) A group of related and adjacent fields of data about a subject or transaction in a database. A collection of rows makes up a database file (table). Also called a "record" or "tuple." See relational database.


Rows in a Relational Table
In a relational database, rows are also called "records" and "tuples."
References in classic literature ?
He approached at the back of one of the most deeply engaged of the Devil's Row children.
The party stood for a moment exchanging vainglorious remarks with Devil's Row. A few stones were thrown at long distances, and words of challenge passed between small warriors.
"Ah, we blokies kin lick deh hull damn Row," said a child, swaggering.
We rowed with all our strength, but it was slow going with so many boats in tow.
When the flotilla had been landed, Nicholas and I and a watchman rowed out in one of the Whitehalls, with Charley in the stern- sheets.
But at last Stephen, who had been rowing more and more idly, ceased to row, laid down the oars, folded his arms, and looked down on the water as if watching the pace at which the boat glided without his help.
There was a man frum down the coast told me once he was in a schooner where they darsen't ever blow a horn to the dories, becaze the skipper - not the man he was with, but a captain that had run her five years before - he'd drownded a boy alongside in a drunk fit; an' ever after, that boy he'd row alongside too and shout, 'Dory!
They heard oars, but could see nothing till the cook, shining and dripping, rowed into them.
Never had the little rocking "We're Here" looked so deliciously home - like as when the cook, born and bred in fogs, rowed them back to her.
It was much harder work now, but Herbert and Startop persevered, and rowed, and rowed, and rowed, until the sun went down.
We got aboard easily, and rowed out into the track of the steamer.
We had all shaken hands cordially, and neither Herbert's eyes nor mine were quite dry, when I saw a four-oared galley shoot out from under the bank but a little way ahead of us, and row out into the same track.