royal

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royal

1. of, relating to, or befitting a king, queen, or other monarch; regal
2. established, chartered by, under the patronage or in the service of royalty
3. being a member of a royal family
4. Nautical just above the topgallant (in the phrase royal mast)
5. Informal a member of a royal family
6. a stag with antlers having 12 or more branches
7. Nautical a sail set next above the topgallant, on a royal mast

royal

1. A cedar shingle, about 24 in. (61 cm) long and ½ in. (1.25 cm) thick at the butt.
2. In military architecture, an especially strongly-defended medieval fort.
References in periodicals archive ?
She then proceeded to get royally drunk with boyfriend Gavin Henson on free champagne.
Another successful story like the author's Royally Jacked and Spin Control, this book tells the tale of a girl who is "too beautiful.
We knew from the start that Hilarion, a sturdy fellow danced wonderfully by Randy Herrera, was a peasant, and that Albrecht was royally.
But I will be royally bothered if they've been cheated out of a chance to experience the beauty and power of the book because a marathon of video game-playing dissipated their time and blunted their sensibilities.
All guests are treated royally, says owner and manager Nigel Roydon.
taxpayers need to follow to receive the royally exemption.
5 million in previously accrued and expensed royally payments.
Everything was fine until I suddenly hit her garden hose and got it royally tangled in my snow blower.
My thesis is that the world needs us instead to waste our time royally in worship and, consequently, to be Church, a people different from the world and thereby prodigally offering the gifts of the extravagant splendor of God.
In most ant colonies, treating a larva royally makes it into a queen.
Lungile Ndlovu, royally appointed leader of Swaziland's "maidens," on King Mswati III's decree that young women will not wear long pants and must not have sex for the next five years as a means of stopping the spread of AIDS, as quoted in The New York Times, September 29