ruby laser


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ruby laser

[′rü·bē ′lā·zər]
(optics)
An optically pumped solid-state laser that uses a ruby crystal to produce an intense and extremely narrow beam of coherent red light.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radiation from a Q-switched ruby laser. Effect of repeated impacts of power output of 10 megawatts on a tattoo of man.
Caption: Figure 2: Fabry-Perot interferogram from Q-switched ruby laser (left) and from SBS in nitrobenzene (right).
The Q-switched ruby laser has been successful in removing minocycline-induced hyperpigmentation of the skin and oral mucosa.
The book describes how, over three years, teams led by physicist Charles Townes (inventor of the maser, the laser's microwave predecessor) and doctoral student Gordon Gould sought to be the first to extend the physical principles used in the maser to the realm of light amplification, only to be beaten out by Ted Maiman, a little known physicist from California, inventor of a small device that was the first working ruby laser. A highly readable chronicle of an exciting period in mid-20th century science, this book will interest many general readers as well as historians of technology.
Once Maiman's ruby laser was announced at a press conference in July 1960, teams working on lasers across the country started making progress quickly and by the end of the year, three different types of laser had been demonstrated.
He said his team's original ruby laser was "pulsed," but in 1961, he and his then-boss Willard S.
When the right light finally appeared to the pair at Hughes, pulsing red at a rate even the one who was color-blind could dimly see, they knew they had the first ruby laser; what is more, they had it on their first try.
The doctor explained they would be using the Q-switched Ruby laser.
While some military laser systems, such as the AN/VVG-2 laser rangefinder used in the M60A3, still used a ruby laser operating in the visible region of the spectrum at 0.69 microns, most used the newer Nd:YAG laser and operated at a wavelength of less than 1.4 microns.
The red light spectrum produced by the ruby laser is emitted in extremely short, high-energy pulses.
The Ruby laser works best on those people with blackish-brown circles due to excess skin pigmentation.
The ruby laser - originally devised to remove tattoos - is attracted by the dark pigment in the hair and produces heat which burns out the hair.