rumination

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rumination

[‚rü·mə′nā·shən]
(medicine)
Voluntary regurgitation of food from the stomach, followed by remastication and swallowing in emotionally or mentally disturbed persons. Also known as merycism.
(physiology)
Regurgitation and remastication of food in preparation for true digestion in ruminants.
(psychology)
An obsessional preoccupation with a single idea or system of ideas.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Goats and sheep fed on roughage alone ruminate at night and eat more during the day, but sheep fed a roughage and supplemented with LH spent more time ruminating than eating.
Lead researcher Turhan Canli, Ph.D., said that this offers a biologic basis for why women have a greater tendency to ruminate, or dwell, on emotional events--and develop depression.
Rather than wrestle with these inquiries, Ashcroft simply admitted that he didn't know, stressing instead that there wasn't any time to ruminate on such trifles.
Rather, readers, especially the theologically uncultivated, should ingest small daily portions of the work, allowing time to ruminate. A number of Baptists may think that the author wrote too much about something quite insignificant.
While hanging around in this highclass neighborhood, let us ruminate on twin transgressions that involve antique possessives.
Those who exhibited insane behavior were harshly treated; "one has to abandon immediately any romantic notion" of the insane "being permitted to gambol on the village green or ruminate idly in the shade of the oak tree," according to Shorter.
While investigating several families of assumed Malvalian affinity, we were confronted with the occurrence of ruminate endosperm in Scytopetalaceae, Sarcolaenaceae, and Sphaerosepalaceae.
The time per period on other activities (TOP) had a negative correlation with the variations in body weight (Table 4), because the longer animals stay on other activities, the shorter will be the time used to feed and ruminate. According to National Research Council (National Research Council [NRC], 2001) an increase in body weight elevates the nutritional requirements for the same weight gain.
Year in and year out, a number of institutions and agencies produce publications and retrospective events that allow audiences to ruminate on the Marcos dictatorship.
Meanwhile, a load of DLT followers ruminate about how the world's gone potty if you can't whistle at a pretty girl these days.
As the premise of the show is an ironic twist of both a lie and truth seeking, many ruminate on lying and its ethical and epistemological consequences.
"Men tend to withdraw; women tend to ruminate. We think that high emotional intimacy and sharing in the marriage may encourage a woman's tendency to ruminate about her depression, disrupting her ability to be available and supportive with her children," she said.