rupture zone


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rupture zone

[′rəp·chər ‚zōn]
(geology)
The region immediately adjacent to the boundary of an explosion crater, characterized by excessive in-place crushing and fracturing where the stresses produced by the explosion have exceeded the ultimate strength of the medium.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The seismic geohazard microzonation along Muzaffarabad Fault is based on hazard parameters such as active faults, active rupture zone, unstable steep slopes, brittle shear zone, active old and new landslides, ground shaking, earthquake deformation, seismic amplification, seismicity and flood.
5 km/s (5,400 mi/hr), taking about 10 minutes to spread over the entire rupture zone.
Parkfield - population 37 - sits on the juncture of the earth's Pacific and North American plates, a grinding 800-mile-long rupture zone better known as the San Andreas Fault.
Fuji, in the center of the rupture zone off Muroto, the center of a major earthquake that hit the Shikoku area in 1946, according to the U.
You pump from the barrels simultaneously into something like a snorkel tube that blasts the materials into the fuel right at the rupture zone, creating a large plug.
Lead author and PhD student at University of Southampton School of Ocean and Earth Science Gemma Smith said that through thermal modeling, it could be calculated that the potential earthquake rupture zone extends to a width of 350 kilometres which is unusually wide compared to most other subduction zones.
At the northernmost reaches of the rupture zone, the tectonic plates probably slipped only 1 or 2 m during the quake.
26 event will probably define what we know about tsunami-generating earthquakes for a long time," said Lin, who plans to survey the rupture zone on the Java Trench this fall on a research cruise with an international team of colleagues.
Data from mapping the earthquake rupture zone will be made public soon after the research cruise ends," Morris said.
The study suggests that rupture of an even larger area than the 1964 rupture zone could create an even bigger tsunami.
The orientation of the strain axes will be also compared with the configuration of the rupture zones of both the 1981 and the 1999 earthquakes (Fig.
In 1989, it adopted its Natural Hazard Ordinance, which mandates detailed engineering site studies for buildings of a certain size that are located in one of a number of seismic hazard zones (including fault rupture zones, liquefaction zones, and landslide zones).