rustication


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rustication

(rŭstĭkā`shən), in building construction, method of creating textures upon masonry wall surfaces, chiefly upon those of stone, by projecting the blocks beyond the surface of the mortar joints. Each joint thus lies in a channel or in a V-shaped groove, between adjoining stones, and a separating shadow line is produced. The degree of projection, whether slight or bold, permits varying effects. The Romans occasionally built rusticated walls. This device was used by Renaissance architects in the palace facades at Florence, a favorite treatment being that of a ground floor with stones of strong projection and roughly textured surface, surmounted by upper stories in which both forms were more refined. Often columns and pilasters also were rusticated. The basement story of the Pitti Palace (mid-15th cent.) exhibits a celebrated example of rustication, some of its enormous and roughly quarried blocks of stone projecting as much as 2 ft 6 in. (76.2 cm) beyond the surface of the joints. The garden architecture of the Italian baroque villavilla.
Although used to designate any country residence, especially in Italy and S France, the term villa particularly refers to a type of pleasure residence with extensive grounds favored by the Romans and richly developed in Italy in the Renaissance.
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 shows many grotesquely textured examples. Rustications also appeared frequently in the Georgian style and in American Colonial architecture.

Rustication

Masonry cut in large blocks with the surface left rough and unfinished, separated by deep recessed joints. The border of each block may be beveled or rabbeted on all four sides or top and bottom. It is used mainly on the lower part of a structure to give a bold, exaggerated took of strength.

Rustication

 

in architecture, the facing of a building with crudely cut or convex stones. Enlivening the wall with a rich play of light and shadow, rustication gives a building a sense of massive strength. In a plastered facade, rustication is simulated by dividing the wall into rectangles or stripes.

rustication

rustication
Same as rustic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Noticing that the hefty Suzanne had gained even more weight during her wartime rustication in the Pyrenees, Mme.
The rustication forms a romantic foil to the building's essentially rational spirit of lucid geometry, muted colour and calm, luminous spaces.
Emphatic rustication on key areas declared not only that the convent was a citadel well protected from external temptations, but also referenced the rhetorical fortifications of patrician palaces, which, Gerard Labrot has argued, were designed to clearly demarcate the palace from the street, the noble from the common people.
Robustness was not an essential ingredient, although the Man of Letters frequently lived to rustication and ripe old age.
The move, known as rustication, means the teenager is still allowed to attend classes.
The move, known as rustication, meant the pupil was allowed to attend lessons but was blocked from having any further contact with classmates.
The artist chose either to exclude or obscure details on the building but finds importance in distinguishing the metal pins, attachments, and rustication left on the older building.
But Lamb introduces this seventeenth-century poet not from a mere antiquarian impulse but because Cotton's rustication among hills and rivers, his disarming lack of affectation, and his ruminative cast of mind fit newer romantic models.
The building has certainly been significantly enhanced since the new Victoria Square opened in 1993, giving Thomason's classical building (which borrows its formula of rustication and Corinthian columns from the nearby Town Hall) an imposing civic setting.
But it seems inadequate only to record the forms of extra-curricular behaviour that might warrant rustication, without contemplating the consequences of not doing any reading or study.
A variety of architectural options are available to distinguish the appearance of a tilt-up structure, including rustication, exposed aggregate, flat stone surfaces, dimpled surfaces, brick facing, curved surfaces, and trompe l'oeil.
At the latter's Palazzo del Te in Mantua, the proportions are deliberately odd, the patterns of rustication undisciplined, and pediments collide with the entablature above, from which the triglyph stones drop down as if the whole structure were about to collapse.