sabadilla


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sabadilla

[‚sa·bə′dē·ə]
(materials)
Ripe seeds of the sabadilla plant (Schoenocaulon officinale) that have been dried; used as an insecticide on cattle. Also known as caustic barley; cevedilla.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sabadilla was first used in the 16th century, and grew in popularity during World War II when pyrethrum and rotenone were in short supply.
More commonly, growers are pursuing organic means of cultivation and the use of more benign insecticides, such as neem, pyrethrins, ryania, and sabadilla. Yet widespread change in the cut flower market may ultimately depend on consumer responsibility in buying organic.
Three years ago Sabadilla enjoyed his finest hour when defeating Cloone River to land the Galway Hurdle.
Botanical insecticides such as nicotine, pyrethrum, rotenone, ryania, and sabadilla control a range of insects with varying success.
Sabadilla advertised his talent when winning last season's Galway Hurdle, and Berkley looks a progressive sort.
Sabadilla (Cevadilla Seed): Relieves pressure on eyeballs and asthma symptoms, sore throat, oversensitivity to odors
Globe-trotting gelding Sabadilla landed a surprise win in the pounds 119,000 Guinness Handicap Hurdle at the Galway Festival yesterday.
Marrone advises that sore eyes can benefit hugely from Euphrasia both as a homeopathic compress and eye drops, while sneezing can be treated very effectively with Sabadilla and Allium Cepa.
Instead of synthetic pesticides, organic farmers use mineral- or plant-derived chemicals -- including copper sulfate, pyrethrum, ryania, and sabadilla -- to control insects and plant diseases.
She advises that sore eyes can benefit hugely from euphrasia, both as a homeopathic compress and eye drops, while sneezing can be treated very effectively with sabadilla and allium cepa.
Gosden, whose father `Towser' won the November Handicap four times, has an impressive record in the race having landed the end-of-season prize in the past with Hieroglyphic (1991), Turgenev (1992) and Sabadilla (1997).