saccharin


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Related to saccharin: aspartame

saccharin

(săk`ərĭn), C7H5NSO3, white, crystalline, aromatic compound. It was discovered accidentally by I. Remsen and C. Fahlberg in 1879. Pure saccharin tastes several hundred times as sweet as sugar. It is not readily soluble in water, but its sodium salt, which is sold commercially, dissolves readily. Saccharin has no nutritional value and is excreted unchanged by the body. It is used as a sweetener by persons who must limit their consumption of sugar. Despite the fact that saccharin causes cancer in laboratory rats, its ban was rescinded after a public outcry. In 1984 the World Health Organization suggested an intake limit of 2.5 mg/day per kg bodyweight. Other nonnutritive artificial sweetenerssweetener, artificial,
substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharin, cyclamates, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879.
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 include sodium cyclamatecyclamate
, any member of a group of salts of cyclamic acid (cyclohexanesulfamic acid). The sodium and calcium salts were commonly used as artificial sweeteners until 1969, when their use was banned by the U.S.
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 and aspartame.

Saccharin

 

(also o-sulfobenzoic imide), a colorless crystalline substance with the structural formula

Saccharin is poorly soluble in water (1:250) and alcohol (1:40) and has a melting point of 228°–229°C. It is sweet but has a bitter aftertaste. The crystal hydrate of the sodium salt of saccharin, known as Crystallose, has a higher solubility in water (1:1.5).

Saccharin is obtained commercially by the oxidation of o-toluenesulfonamide. With a sweetness 400–500 times that of sugar, saccharin was formerly used in great quantities as a sugar substitute. It is not assimilated by the body but rather is excreted in the urine. Saccharin is used as a sweetener for certain items, such as toothpaste, and as an additive in electroplating technology.

saccharin

[′sak·ə·rən]
(organic chemistry)
C6H4COSO2NH A sweet-tasting, white powder, soluble in acetates, benzene, and alcohol; slightly soluble in water and ether; melts at 228°C; used as a sugar substitute for syrups, and in medicines, foods, and beverages. Also known as benzosulfimide; gluside.

saccharin

a very sweet white crystalline slightly soluble powder used as a nonfattening sweetener. Formula: C7H5NO3S
References in periodicals archive ?
Key words: Indian crested porcupine, Hystrix indica, zinc phosphide, grain baits, groundnut, maize, saccharin.
The primary aim of this paper is to present the results of SEM, XRD, PL, and Raman analysis carried out for CdO films as a function of saccharin concentration.
Regardless of the final ruling on saccharin, the FDA could make other rulings that help to open up the sweetener industry, either by allowing new uses for existing sweetener products or by allowing the use of sweeteners new to the U.S.
Compared with nondrinkers, diet soda consumers "demonstrated more widespread activation to both saccharin and sucrose in reward-processing brain regions," the scientists say.
The rats who drank the saccharin beverage ate three times the calories of those who did not.
Concluding that the animal studies aren't applicable to humans, the government removed saccharin from its official list of cancer-causing agents earlier this year.
A second flavor is paired with a noncaloric US like water or saccharin. After 8 to 10 serial discrimination trials, preference for the flavor paired with the caloric solution is assessed by a two-bottle preference test or by several one-bottle tests.
Saccharin consumption on Days 12 and 14 of Experiment 2 is represented in Figure 3.
The Environmental Protection Agency has removed the artificial sweetener saccharin and its salts from the agency's list of hazardous substances.
Like all Little Remedies products, Little Fevers contains no artificial flavors or colors and no alcohol, saccharin or gluten.
The complainant's name has never been released, but noted advocate of alternative medicine Andrew Weil, M.D., says, "It's hard to avoid the conclusion that the FDA's position was motivated, at least to some degree, by a desire to protect the manufacturer of aspartame (NutraSweet)." The three big FDA-approved artificial sweeteners are NutraSweet, Sweet'N Low (saccharin), and Sunette (acesulfame K).
SACCHARIN. Discovered over a century ago, saccharin is a synthetic artificial sweetener that is 300 times sweeter than sugar.