sackbut

(redirected from sackbuts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

sackbut

(săk`bət), Renaissance name for the slide trombone, probably derived from the old French word sacqueboute, which means "pull-push." The instrument achieved its present form in the 15th cent., the only differences being a narrower bore and a smaller bell. These differences lent the sackbut, sometimes called a posuane, a less mellow tone than its modern counterpart.

sackbut

a medieval form of trombone
References in periodicals archive ?
The next item in the preface, "the Cantate in eight parts by the same Hieronymus Practorius," was performed by the choir, organs, cornetts, and sackbuts.
Let us just take a closer look at Pickett's instrumentarium: shawms and sackbuts are there, as are trumpets, cornetts, the recorder and the bass dulcian, all of which might just be plausible in the wind-band context, but the question whether they would have doubled the voices remains to be resolved.
Sabol opens his score with a five-part piece by William Brade for 'The Entry of the King and his Retinue' which he assigns to cornetts and sackbuts.
The stimulating old days of my first Renaissance band (`How about gar klein recorder, alto crumhorn, sackbut and rackett?
For, if we had only the bare polyphonic fabric contained in the notes of the score, without the suggestive title and without the sound of the cornett and sackbuts to guide our response, would we necessarily perceive it as more monumental and grandly sculptural than other works of similar fabrication?
Sackbuts are the forerunners of the trombone and do not look very different.
That evening the York Waits, armed with a panoply of shawms, sackbuts, cornetts, crumhorns, hurdy-gurdies and bagpipes, join forces with the Orlando Consort, whose recording of Dunstaple's motets was a Gramophone Award winner, to illustrate the contrasti ng secular and religious sides of music contemporary with the early 15th century knight Richard Beauchamp.
These show that Philip van Wilder was `of the Privy Chamber' by 1529 and record numerous payments to him for the purchase of instruments--shawms, sackbuts, lute strings, etc.
The trumpeters, for example, often performed fanfares during important ceremonial occasions and the sackbuts and shawms formed an `alta capella' bend which accompanied dances and banquets in the Great Hall and outer Presence Chamber.
Most favoured were recorders (flautas), shawms (chirimias), cornetts and sackbuts, where the instrumentalists often read from the same large choirbooks as the singers (Stevenson 1961:298).
These are described as sackbuts in the accompanying text, instruments which were regularly supplied to the Chapel Royal at this time and which are known to have been identical in form to Praetorius's `Posaun'.
A consort of sackbuts and cornetts was more common in ceremonial music.