calumet

(redirected from sacred pipe)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Calumet

(kăl`yo͞omĕt'), industrialized region of NW Ind. and NE Ill., along the south shore of Lake Michigan. Once a great heavy industry and steel manufacturing center, the area has become largely residential. The chief cities of the region are Gary, East Chicago, and Hammond (all in Indiana).

calumet

[Fr.,=reed], name given by the French to the peace pipe used by the indigenous people of North America for smoking tobacco; it consisted of a long, feathered stem, with or without a pipe bowl. Such pipes were considered sacred, offering communion with the animate powers of the universe and embodying the honor and the source of power of Native Americans who possessed them. Every aspect of their fashioning and decoration was symbolic, and they varied from tribe to tribe. Calumets were particularly used at the conclusion of peace treaties and in ceremonies of adoption. They served as ambassadors' credentials and were passports of safe-conduct wherever recognized. To refuse to smoke the calumet when invited was considered an extreme insult. The pipes were principally used by the Dakotan (Siouan) and Algonquian peoples of the Great Plains and in the SE United States. However, pipes were used throughout most of North America, and communal smoking, wherever found, usually carried the guarantees of amity granted with food sharing. In the Middle West pipestonepipestone,
hard, dull red or mottled pink-and-white clay stone, carved by Native Americans into pipes. Called calumets (see calumet) the pipes were used extensively in ceremonials.
..... Click the link for more information.
 was much used in making them.
References in periodicals archive ?
To insure accuracy, Black Elk used his son Ben to translate his words for Black Elk Speaks and The Sacred Pipe. In so doing, Ben learned about his father's medicine man practice for the first time.
Paul Steinmetz, a Jesuit priest who served on the Pine Ridge Reservation from 1961 to 1981 and received a doctorate in religious studies under Ake Hultkrantz, constructs an "archetypal theology" of the Sacred Pipe by calling upon three disciplines: psychology (as represented by Carl Jung's theory of archetypes), phenomenology (as represented by Mircea Eliade's ideas on "primitive" religious symbolism), and theology (as represented by Karl Rahner's construction of the anonymous Christian).
The sacred pipe (from Pipestone in South-Western Minnesota) has become a powerful, portable altar, utilized in ceremonies.
It serves to make peace between nations in Black Elk, The Sacred Pipe 1971: 101-15; to create a special bond of loyalty between two individuals in Walker, The Sun Dance 1917:122-40 and Lakota Belief and Ritual 1980: 193-239; and, as in Valandry's case, to instruct and honor children in kinship and generosity, in Densmore 1918: 68-77).
In the forty years since he served as Nicholas Black Elk's amanuensis for the Sacred Pipe (the celebrated exposition of the seven cardinal rituals of the Oglala Sioux) Joseph Epes Brown has emerged as one of the most respected interpreters of Lakota cultural and religious traditions.
Traditional narratives explaining the origin of medicine bundles were generally known only to a handful of bundle owners.(45) Cree shaman Fine Day reported that the first sacred pipe bundles, containing the "Powers of the Universe, such as Birds, Animals, Air, Water and so forth," were given to Earth Man by the Manitou.(46) In McNickle's story of Feather Boy, it is the Thunderbird who gave the bundle "in the long ago" to the people via a young woman, with the promise:
Within this context he explains his viewpoint that to approach understanding of current Oglala religion, the interrelationship of the Sacred Pipe, Bible, and Peyote has to be accounted for.
The sacred pipe is still carried by elders of today's Lakota community.
Among the stories included in this fourth volume Of the Native American Story Book are: The Woman and her Bear, The Story of Winter Snow, The Warrior of High Cliff, The Sacred Pipe of the T'salagi, The Origin of Fire and the Canoe, The Long Journey, A New Bow for Tani, The Trickster's Great Fall and His Revenge, Grandfather Thunder, The Origin of the Doll Being and many, many more.
For example, the claim is not that the ritual use of the sacred pipe and the eucharist are the same, without recognizing differences (that is, the Lakota do not understand the sharing of the pipe as sacramental in the exact same way that Christians understand their sacraments).
The way that I look at it is that the Sacred Pipe, there's the bowl and there's the stem ...
The sacred pipe was placed within a hidden cave on the north side of Bear Lodge.