safe-conduct


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safe-conduct

1. a document giving official permission to travel through a region, esp in time of war
2. the protection afforded by such a document
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
1793) ("If a subject attaches the person or goods of any one, who comes by way of amity, truce, or safe-conduct, the chancellor, calling to him any justice of the one bench or the other, on a bill of complaint, may make process against the offender; and may award delivery and restitution of the person, ship or goods."); 1 id.
Elphinstone's force in Kabul; accepted Elphinstone's surrender (January 6, 1842) and granted the small army and about 12,000 refugees safe-conduct to India; surrounded this force at Gandamak on the Khyber Pass road, and massacred it after a brief battle (January 15); he survived the subsequent British invasion, and died in 1849.
Earlier, the Department of Justice ordered an immigration watch against the NDFP consultants after the termination of the safe-conduct granted to them for the peace negotiations.
To repeat this crucial point more tersely, a safe-conduct violation was the equivalent of an alien "tort only in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States." A safe-conduct violation was most likely to occur against a friendly or neutral alien by the hand of a native citizen within the territory of the promising sovereign.
The government on Tuesday stepped up its offensive against communist guerrillas after it terminated the peace talks, announcing an 'all-out war' against the New People's Army (NPA) and canceling safe-conduct passes to all rebels involved in the negotiations.
DAVAO city -- Incoming President Rodrigo Duterte said he will issue a safe-conduct to exiled communist leader Jose Maria Sison so he could return to the country and participate in the peace talks with the government.
Born about 1821, he was adopted by the last Maratha peshwa (chief minister) Baji Rao II (1827), and became Baji Rao's heir (1841); when Baji Rao died in 1851, Nana inherited his private property in the Bithur region (near Kanpur) and was granted Baji Rao's jagir (revenues of a district), but despite repeated entreaties to the British and the adoptive father's deathbed request, Nana was refused an extension of Baji Rao's life pension; disgruntled by this, and perhaps aware of British difficulties in the Crimean War, he hastened to Cawnpore at the outbreak of the mutiny and tossed in his lot with rebellious sepoys (June 5, 1857); he apparently led troops at the siege of Cawnpore, and although Nana may not have exercised effective command when the safe-conduct truce was broken and Gen.