safflower

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Related to safflower oils: Safflower seed oil

safflower,

Eurasian thistlelike herb (Carthamus tinctorius) of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family). Safflower, or false saffron, has long been cultivated in S Asia and Egypt for food and medicine and as a costly but inferior substitute for the true saffronsaffron,
name for a fall-flowering plant (Crocus sativus) of the family Iridaceae (iris family) and also for a dye obtained therefrom. The plant is native to Asia Minor, where for centuries it has been cultivated for its aromatic orange-yellow stigmas (see pistil).
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 dye. In the United States, where it is sometimes called American saffron, it is more important as the source of safflower oil, which has recently come into wide use as a cooking oil. Safflower is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
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safflower

safflower

Dried flowers are used as a less expensive substitute for saffron. Safflower is extremely effective in lowering cholesterol levels. Laxative effect helps bowel movements. Encourages menstruation and treats abdominal pains. Helps skin heal open wounds and bruises. Used for all kinds of skin disorders like rashes, measles. Tea used for hysteria, panic attacks, fevers, mucus. Yellow, orange or red globular flowers, one to five per branch. Each flower contains 15-20 seeds, which are the source of the famous safflower oil (flavorless and colorless, like sunflower oil) Safflower seeds can be used in bird feeders instead of sunflower seeds because squirrels don’t like them. Safflower oil is also used as a medium for oil paints. If you want to use natural pigments and dyes, mix them with safflower oil to paint.

safflower

[′sa‚flau̇·ər]
(botany)
Carthamus tinctorius. An annual thistlelike herb belonging to the composite family (Compositae); the leaves are edible, flowers yield dye, and seeds yield a cooking oil.

safflower

a thistle-like Eurasian annual plant, Carthamus tinctorius, having large heads of orange-yellow flowers and yielding a dye and an oil used in paints, medicines, etc.: family Asteraceae (composites)
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared to most other common edible oils, relatively safflower oil contains the highest level of the linoleic acid, an essential fatty acid, which is make it as premium edible oil, because of its nutritional advantages and potential therapeutically properties in the prevention of coronary heart disease and cancer but the presence of the large amounts of linoleic acid makes the oil quite sensitive to oxidation [12].
From a nutritional point of view, the safflower seed oil has unique quality and may possess many potential health benefits because of its high level of linoleic acid, phytosterol ([beta]-sitosterol) and [alpha]-tocopherol, the biologically active isomer of vitamin E, and safflower oil was also found to be effective in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease by lowering plasma total and bad LDL cholesterol levels.
Participants were randomized into a control group and 3 intervention groups; peanut oil, olive oil, and safflower oil.
Comparisons were made between peanut and olive oil to determine whether there were differences in response to two oils high in MUFA, as well as safflower oil, to contrast the effects of MUFA-rich versus PUFA-rich oils.
The intervention entailed provision of peanut oil (N=32), olive oil (N=32), safflower oil (N=33), or no oil (N=2) daily for 8 weeks.
The most notable differences between the health information variables occur for palm, fish, and safflower oils, as well as butter.
Because the prices of other oils (palm oil, fish oil, safflower oil, and butter) do not possess problems in estimation, they remain as individual oils in the model.
The demands for fats and oils are all inelastic with respect to their own prices except for safflower oil, which is very elastic in models Y and Z.
So Judd and his colleagues decided to investigate whether, in order to lower blood pressure, fat-lovers had to cut down on all forms, or might instead get by with substituting more polyunsaturated fats, like safflower oils, for the butter they loved.