sago

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sago

(sā`gō) [Malay], edible starch extracted from the pithlike center of several E Asian palmspalm,
common name for members of the Palmae, a large family of chiefly tropical trees, shrubs, and vines. Most species are treelike, characterized by a crown of compound leaves, called fronds, terminating a tall, woody, unbranched stem.
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 (chiefly Metroxylon sagu) or sometimes of cycadscycad
, any plant of the order Cycadales, tropical and subtropical palmlike evergreens. The cycads, ginkgoes, and conifers comprise the three major orders of gymnosperms, or cone-bearing plants (see cone and plant). The cycads first appeared in the Permian period.
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. The starch is an important item in the diet in some parts of E Asia and is exported for use in foods (e.g., puddings) and for stiffening textiles. Sago is obtained by grinding the stem content of a filled mature sago palm that is beginning to flower into powder and washing the starch free. For local use it is pulverized, but for the market it is usually sieved and then heated to form granules. The florists' sago palm is not a true palm but a cycad of the American genus Zamia. Z. floridana, called wild sago or coontie, yields Florida arrowrootarrowroot,
any plant of the genus Maranta, usually large perennial herbs, of the family Marantaceae, found chiefly in warm, swampy forest habitats of the Americas and sometimes cultivated for their ornamental leaves.
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Sago

 

granules of starch. Natural sago is made from the starchy pith of some palm species (sago palms) or from cassava roots. Artificial sago is obtained from potato, corn, and other starches. The granules of raw starch are given a spherical shape, steamed at high temperatures to size the surface, and then dried. Sago is used to prepare gruels and as filling for pastries.

sago

[′sā·gō]
(materials)
A starch obtained from the trunks of certain tropical palms, such as the sago; used as a thickening agent in food and as textile stiffening.