said


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Related to said: Edward Said

said

(in contracts, pleadings, etc.) named or mentioned previously; aforesaid

SAID

References in classic literature ?
That night, after we had went to bed, I said to Gentleman, "Gentleman," I says, "what's going to be done about this?
Specially after what I said to him about the way he ought to behave.
SOCRATES: Then it follows from your own admissions, that virtue is doing what you do with a part of virtue; for justice and the like are said by you to be parts of virtue.
He said he'd be mighty sure to see it, because he'd be a free man the minute he seen it, but if he missed it he'd be in a slave country again and no more show for freedom.
Jim said it made him all over trembly and feverish to be so close to freedom.
Well, me and Tom allowed we would come along afoot and take a smell of the woods, and we run across Lem Beebe and Jim Lane, and they asked us to go with them blackberrying to-night, and said they could borrow Jubiter Dunlap's dog, because he had told them just that minute--"
He only said, "Um," in a kind of a disappointed way, and didn't take no more intrust.
When Simonides said that the repayment of a debt was justice, he did not mean to include that case?
Having at length finished his laboured harangue, with which the audience, though it had greatly raised their attention and admiration, were not much edified, as they really understood not a single syllable of all he had said, he proceeded to business, which he was more expeditious in finishing, than he had been in beginning.
Threepence,' said I, 'when I spin, and fourpence when I work plain work.
Dat bloke was a dandy," said Pete, in conclusion, "but he hadn' oughta made no trouble.
To whom Mrs Veneering incoherently communicates, how that Veneering has been offered Pocket-Breaches; how that it is the time for rallying round; how that Veneering has said 'We must work'; how that she is here, as a wife and mother, to entreat Lady Tippins to work; how that the carriage is at Lady Tippins's disposal for purposes of work; how that she, proprietress of said bran new elegant equipage, will return home on foot--on bleeding feet if need be--to work (not specifying how), until she drops by the side of baby's crib.