sailor


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sailor

any member of a ship's crew, esp one below the rank of officer

sailor

A brick laid vertically with the broad face exposed. See also: Brick

What does it mean when you dream about a sailor?

Dreaming of being a sailor or being with a sailor often reflects a desire to be adventurous. Perhaps the dreamer is ready to explore new areas and venture into deeper waters, particularly in personal relationships.

sailor

A brick that is laid on end (i.e., positioned vertically), with its wider face showing on the wall surface; compare with soldier.
References in classic literature ?
How about you, Spider?" "And I," replied the sailor.
The two men who had pushed the strugglers with their feet were assailed with abuse by the sailors, who had become reconciled.
"It was I," said a sailor of a frank and manly appearance; "and it was time, for you were sinking."
Coasting seamen and bay sailors they mostly were, although there were many 'longshoremen and waterfront workmen among them.
and O., blond Northmen from a Swedish barque, Japanese from a man-of-war, English sailors, Spaniards, pleasant-looking fellows from a French cruiser, negroes off an American tramp.
The old sailor then went off, and began speaking very earnestly to Mow-Mow and some other chiefs, while all the rest formed a circle round the taboo place, looking intently at Toby, and talking to each other without ceasing.
Half doubled, the man shuffled cautiously away toward the sailors. The ape moved with him, taking one of his arms.
"So," murmured the sailor, "they can see us as we see them."
It was mid-afternoon that brought the little old sailor, who had been felled by the captain a few days before, to where Clayton and his wife stood by the ship's side watching the ever diminishing outlines of the great battleship.
Groslow, then, having given the sailor on duty an order to be on the watch with more than usual vigilance, went down into the longboat and soon reached Greenwich.
At the upper end of the room, were a couple of boys, one of them very tall and the other very short, both dressed as sailors--or at least as theatrical sailors, with belts, buckles, pigtails, and pistols complete--fighting what is called in play-bills a terrific combat, with two of those short broad-swords with basket hilts which are commonly used at our minor theatres.
"A tall man, sir, with a big black beard, dressed like a sailor."