salient

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salient

1. Geometry (of an angle) pointing outwards from a polygon and hence less than 180°
2. (esp of animals) leaping
3. a salient angle

Salient

Any part or prominent member projecting beyond a surface.

salient

[′sāl·yənt]
(geology)
A landform that projects or extends outward or upward from its surroundings.
An area in which the axial traces of folds are convex toward the outer edge of the folded belt.

salient

Describing any projecting part or member, as a salient corner.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where the last factor normalizes the computed saliency measurement Gi for each group with respect to the minimum G detected among all groups with high motion saliency values.
In addition, we believe that the saliency detection could be regarded as a kind of probability problem, which can be resolved by the Bayesian inference.
The effect can be understood in terms of a saliency effect, with the relative characteristic of S+ being more pronounced when it appears across multiple training pairs than when it is present within a single pair.
It extracted features in Krauskopf's color space and implemented saliency in three separate parallel channels: visibility, perceptual grouping, and perception.
19] proposed employing center-surround differences across multi-scale image features to implement image saliency detection.
Then three-channel saliency maps can be generated by normalization.
The magnetic saliency of the CPPM machine is analysed by the FEA method and confirmed by measurement of a CPPM machine.
This attempt takes place through the promotion of both issues and attributes saliency through media relations tactics.
Moreover, most of these issues also lack for either or both parties the same saliency and political sensitivity (in both countries) that characterize the more contentious concerns above.
Visual saliency can be assessed as a combination of purely physical image properties such as local contrast, energy, and spatial orientation (Itti & Koch, 2000; Walther & Koch, 2006).
The rhetorical power of a frame comes from its function to heighten the saliency of some aspects of reality over others" (p.
As we broach the oft-discussed topic - whether the Philips brand has lost its saliency over the years - Chopra gets his CEO hat out and brushes it off; "while the brand's engagement with consumers is seen by all, the B2B (business 2 business) engagement is not visible to the general public".