salinization


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Related to salinization: desertification

salinization

[‚sal·ən·ə′zā·shən]
(geology)
In a soil of an arid, poorly drained region, the accumulation of soluble salts by the evaporation of the waters that bore them to the soil zone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Secondary salinization also occurs on non-irrigated lands where deforestation and reduced evapotranspiration causes a shallow groundwater table to rise.
The wells P10, P27, P38, P51, P60, P68, P86, P92, P111, P104, P114, P133 and P136, and the Riacho Verde reservoir, which acts as a recharge source of the alluvial aquifer through small controlled releases during the dry period, were used in the simulations of the salinization dynamics.
Potential salinization sources are diverse, including natural saline groundwater, halite dissolution, presence of paleo-brackish water, seawater intrusion, oil and gas-field brine, domestic, agricultural and industrial effluents, and road salts.
Treatments with IAA, in most salinization levels, resulted in a marked stimulation of CAT activity as compared with control salt group.
To investigate whether past salinization events can be detected in geochemical profiles from near-surface permafrost, we obtained soil cores at impacted and unimpacted sites that extended to depths of 2.
He said that some other problems being faced by Balochistan included soil mismanagement, salinization of irregulated areas and dry-land degradation from overgrazing.
Citing a briefing at the University of Oxford Refugee Studies Centre, the report says that by 2050, "rising sea levels could displace more than 14 million Egyptians as increased salinization of the Nile reduces the irrigated land available for agriculture.
The MENA region, he said, is currently the most water-deprived region and the situation is expected to get worse given rapid salinization of water sources.
Part of the problem is purely geographical: Havana is located on the narrowest part of the island--it's barely 20 miles from the north coast to the south coast--and depends mostly on the exploitation of rich groundwater aquifers that are vulnerable to the twin threats of salinization and pollution resulting from overuse and mismanagement.
126-7) are not sustainable: the number of fish caught in the wild will decline as a result of over-fishing, and irrigated farmland will degrade from exhaustion of aquifers and salinization.
Because of salinization, erosion, and other management issues, the global supply of irrigated farm land per capita has shrunk precipitously in the last several decades.
The damage will come from the incalculable number of trees felled, the millions of cubic meters of earth moved and dumped, and, perhaps worse, the salinization of the waters of the lakes--Gantun and Miraflores--which are the drinking water for the populations of the zone.