salt glaze

salt glaze

[′sȯlt ‚glāz]
(engineering)
Glaze formed on the surface of stoneware by putting salt into the kiln during firing.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We have a series of demos and talks from some experts, including one on Saturday from Walter Keeler, a salt glaze ceramicist who is an international expert in his field.
Many of the young potters started experimenting with salt glaze, something that interested Boehm.
Hers is an auspicious site, as it is only a few miles from the first known salt glaze kiln in the UK that was situated by the river Thames at Woolwich.
They worked mainly with a salt glaze stoneware, a high-temperature firing method where salt was thrown into the kiln, in order to fuse with the clay and give a surface which could be glassy or matt depending on the conditions of each firing.
Voulkos's choice of a dark-blue salt glaze in this work is connotative of old New England crockery.
THIS is a 19th-century copy of a 16th-century salt glaze jug.
In addition to rare antique bottles, Alan's specialisms include pot lids; ginger beers; antique enamel advertising signs; breweriana - anything related to pubs and brewing, notably Guinness; salt glaze pottery, such as Doulton Lambeth jugs and utilitarian wares; earthenware cream pots; clay pipes; early glass baby feeders; inks, pharmacy, poisons and so-called "curealls"; eye baths, mineral waters and more.
The author presents an in-depth study on the societal and political factors that determined who used Northern European salt glaze stoneware.
Barnim has explored several areas of production, his previous work was in salt glaze, inspired from the traditional ceramics of the European pioneers of Ontario.
"This presentation of a large salt glaze tea pot and mugs encapsulates the work of Wally Keeler at its best.
I cannot establish from the photo the type of glaze that has been used, it is too late to be salt glaze. Its value would be around pounds 50-pounds 100.