saltbox house

saltbox house

saltbox house
In colonial New England, a timber-framed house, commonly two and one-half stories high, having a hall-and-parlor plan; gables at each end wall; a sloping roof with slope on the rear side of the ridge much longer and less steep than the slope on the front side. This roof contour gave the house a shape resembling a box for holding salt used at that time in the British colonies.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1991 an additional 20 acres were added, including a reproduction saltbox house, part of the present-day Doyle campus.
Preservationists have also succeeded in funding the restoration of a number of historically important structures, including an ancient cookhouse that now serves as a libra," with free Internet connections for local students; an old jail that dates back more than a century to the days when Green Turtle Cay was the administrative seat for the Northern Abacos; an authentic saltbox house that was disassembled in Hope Town and brought to New Plymouth as dowry for a marriage that never took place; and Captain Roland Robert's House, a former sea captain's residence now debug business as an ecological museum.
In 1858, when James Johnston built his saltbox house in Half Moon Bay for an extravagant $10,000, settlers were poised for explosive urban growth.